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Hydrogen sulphide release to surface waters at the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary.
Nature. 2008 Jun 05; 453(7196):767-9.Nat

Abstract

Animal-like multicellular fossils appeared towards the end of the Precambrian, followed by a rapid increase in the abundance and diversity of fossils during the Early Cambrian period, an event also known as the 'Cambrian explosion'. Changes in the environmental conditions at the Precambrian/Cambrian transition (about 542 Myr ago) have been suggested as a possible explanation for this event, but are still a matter of debate. Here we report molybdenum isotope signatures of black shales from two stratigraphically correlated sample sets with a depositional age of around 542 Myr. We find a transient molybdenum isotope signal immediately after the Precambrian/Cambrian transition. Using a box model of the oceanic molybdenum cycle, we find that intense upwelling of hydrogen sulphide-rich deep ocean water best explains the observed Early Cambrian molybdenum isotope signal. Our findings suggest that the Early Cambrian animal radiation may have been triggered by a major change in ocean circulation, terminating a long period during which the Proterozoic ocean was stratified, with sulphidic deep water.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, 3012 Bern, Switzerland. martin.wille@anu.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18509331

Citation

Wille, Martin, et al. "Hydrogen Sulphide Release to Surface Waters at the Precambrian/Cambrian Boundary." Nature, vol. 453, no. 7196, 2008, pp. 767-9.
Wille M, Nägler TF, Lehmann B, et al. Hydrogen sulphide release to surface waters at the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. Nature. 2008;453(7196):767-9.
Wille, M., Nägler, T. F., Lehmann, B., Schröder, S., & Kramers, J. D. (2008). Hydrogen sulphide release to surface waters at the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. Nature, 453(7196), 767-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature07072
Wille M, et al. Hydrogen Sulphide Release to Surface Waters at the Precambrian/Cambrian Boundary. Nature. 2008 Jun 5;453(7196):767-9. PubMed PMID: 18509331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hydrogen sulphide release to surface waters at the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. AU - Wille,Martin, AU - Nägler,Thomas F, AU - Lehmann,Bernd, AU - Schröder,Stefan, AU - Kramers,Jan D, Y1 - 2008/05/28/ PY - 2007/07/18/received PY - 2008/05/09/accepted PY - 2008/5/30/pubmed PY - 2008/7/17/medline PY - 2008/5/30/entrez SP - 767 EP - 9 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 453 IS - 7196 N2 - Animal-like multicellular fossils appeared towards the end of the Precambrian, followed by a rapid increase in the abundance and diversity of fossils during the Early Cambrian period, an event also known as the 'Cambrian explosion'. Changes in the environmental conditions at the Precambrian/Cambrian transition (about 542 Myr ago) have been suggested as a possible explanation for this event, but are still a matter of debate. Here we report molybdenum isotope signatures of black shales from two stratigraphically correlated sample sets with a depositional age of around 542 Myr. We find a transient molybdenum isotope signal immediately after the Precambrian/Cambrian transition. Using a box model of the oceanic molybdenum cycle, we find that intense upwelling of hydrogen sulphide-rich deep ocean water best explains the observed Early Cambrian molybdenum isotope signal. Our findings suggest that the Early Cambrian animal radiation may have been triggered by a major change in ocean circulation, terminating a long period during which the Proterozoic ocean was stratified, with sulphidic deep water. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18509331/Hydrogen_sulphide_release_to_surface_waters_at_the_Precambrian/Cambrian_boundary_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nature07072 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -