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Evaluation of injection moulding as a pharmaceutical technology to produce matrix tablets.
Eur J Pharm Biopharm. 2009 Jan; 71(1):145-54.EJ

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop sustained-release matrix tablets by means of injection moulding and to evaluate the influence of process temperature, matrix composition (EC and HPMC concentration) and viscosity grade of ethylcellulose (EC) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) on processability and drug release. The drug release data were analyzed to get insight in the release kinetics and mechanism. Formulations containing metoprolol tartrate (30%, model drug), EC with dibutyl sebacate (matrix former and plasticizer) and hydrophilic polymer HPMC were extruded and subsequently injection moulded into tablets (375 mg, 10 mm diameter, convex-shaped) at temperatures ranging from 110 to 140 degrees C. Tablets containing 30% metoprolol and 70% ethylcellulose (EC 4mPa s) showed an incomplete drug release within 24 h (<50%). Increasing production temperatures resulted in a lower drug release rate. Substituting part of the EC fraction by HPMC (HPMC/EC-ratio: 20/50 and 35/35) resulted in faster and constant drug release rates. Formulations containing 50% HPMC had a complete and first-order drug release profile with drug release controlled via the combination of diffusion and swelling/erosion. Faster drug release rates were observed for higher viscosity grades of EC (Mw>20 mPa s) and HPMC (4000 and 10,000 mPa s). Tablet porosity was low (<4%). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction studies (X-RD) showed that solid dispersions were formed during processing. Using thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA) and gel-permeation chromatography no degradation of drug and matrix polymer was observed. The surface morphology was investigated with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showing an influence of the process temperature. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the drug is distributed in the entire matrix, however, some drug clusters were identified.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18511248

Citation

Quinten, Thomas, et al. "Evaluation of Injection Moulding as a Pharmaceutical Technology to Produce Matrix Tablets." European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics : Official Journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft Fur Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik E.V, vol. 71, no. 1, 2009, pp. 145-54.
Quinten T, De Beer T, Vervaet C, et al. Evaluation of injection moulding as a pharmaceutical technology to produce matrix tablets. Eur J Pharm Biopharm. 2009;71(1):145-54.
Quinten, T., De Beer, T., Vervaet, C., & Remon, J. P. (2009). Evaluation of injection moulding as a pharmaceutical technology to produce matrix tablets. European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics : Official Journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft Fur Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik E.V, 71(1), 145-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpb.2008.02.025
Quinten T, et al. Evaluation of Injection Moulding as a Pharmaceutical Technology to Produce Matrix Tablets. Eur J Pharm Biopharm. 2009;71(1):145-54. PubMed PMID: 18511248.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of injection moulding as a pharmaceutical technology to produce matrix tablets. AU - Quinten,Thomas, AU - De Beer,Thomas, AU - Vervaet,Chris, AU - Remon,Jean Paul, Y1 - 2008/04/10/ PY - 2007/10/29/received PY - 2008/02/13/revised PY - 2008/02/17/accepted PY - 2008/5/31/entrez PY - 2008/5/31/pubmed PY - 2009/4/7/medline SP - 145 EP - 54 JF - European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.V JO - Eur J Pharm Biopharm VL - 71 IS - 1 N2 - The aim of this study was to develop sustained-release matrix tablets by means of injection moulding and to evaluate the influence of process temperature, matrix composition (EC and HPMC concentration) and viscosity grade of ethylcellulose (EC) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) on processability and drug release. The drug release data were analyzed to get insight in the release kinetics and mechanism. Formulations containing metoprolol tartrate (30%, model drug), EC with dibutyl sebacate (matrix former and plasticizer) and hydrophilic polymer HPMC were extruded and subsequently injection moulded into tablets (375 mg, 10 mm diameter, convex-shaped) at temperatures ranging from 110 to 140 degrees C. Tablets containing 30% metoprolol and 70% ethylcellulose (EC 4mPa s) showed an incomplete drug release within 24 h (<50%). Increasing production temperatures resulted in a lower drug release rate. Substituting part of the EC fraction by HPMC (HPMC/EC-ratio: 20/50 and 35/35) resulted in faster and constant drug release rates. Formulations containing 50% HPMC had a complete and first-order drug release profile with drug release controlled via the combination of diffusion and swelling/erosion. Faster drug release rates were observed for higher viscosity grades of EC (Mw>20 mPa s) and HPMC (4000 and 10,000 mPa s). Tablet porosity was low (<4%). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction studies (X-RD) showed that solid dispersions were formed during processing. Using thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA) and gel-permeation chromatography no degradation of drug and matrix polymer was observed. The surface morphology was investigated with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showing an influence of the process temperature. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the drug is distributed in the entire matrix, however, some drug clusters were identified. SN - 1873-3441 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18511248/Evaluation_of_injection_moulding_as_a_pharmaceutical_technology_to_produce_matrix_tablets_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0939-6411(08)00135-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -