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Plasma brain natriuretic peptide predicts short-term clinical outcome in heart failure patients with restrictive filling pattern.
J Card Fail. 2008 Jun; 14(5):420-5.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an important parameter of severity in congestive heart failure (CHF). We analyzed if BNP might stratify 6-month clinical outcome in outpatients with CHF with restrictive mitral filling pattern.

METHODS

All subjects with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II to IV and restrictive filling pattern were enrolled at hospital discharge after an acute decompensation. NYHA class, BNP, and echocardiogram for the evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and diastolic function were analyzed. Death and hospital readmission for CHF were the clinical events observed.

RESULTS

A total of 250 patients (66% were male, mean age 73 years) were enrolled. The mean NYHA class was 2.5 +/- 0.6, LVEF was 38% +/- 15%, and mean deceleration time was 120 +/- 16 ms. The mean BNP was 643 +/- 566 pg/mL. During the 6-month follow-up, 35 patients (14%) died and 106 patients (42.4%) were readmitted for CHF (event group); in 109 patients (43.6%) no events were observed (no-event group). Higher NYHA class (2.7 +/- 0.6 vs 2.4 +/- 0.6, P = .001) and reduced LVEF (34% +/- 13% vs 42% +/- 17%, P = .01) but similar deceleration time (119 +/- 16 ms vs 122 +/- 17 ms, P = not significant) were observed in the event group. A higher level of mean BNP (833 +/- 604 pg/mL vs 397 +/- 396 pg/mL, P = .01) was recorded in the event group. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed that LVEF (P = .04), NYHA class (P = .02), and plasma BNP (P = .0001) were associated with adverse short-term clinical outcome.

CONCLUSION

Patients with CHF with a restrictive diastolic pattern had poor short-term clinical outcome. NYHA class and LVEF at discharge might predict cardiovascular events, but plasma BNP proved to be the strongest predictor.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiovascular Diseases Ospedale Santa Croce-Carle Cuneo, Cuneo, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18514935

Citation

Feola, Mauro, et al. "Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Predicts Short-term Clinical Outcome in Heart Failure Patients With Restrictive Filling Pattern." Journal of Cardiac Failure, vol. 14, no. 5, 2008, pp. 420-5.
Feola M, Aspromonte N, Milani L, et al. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide predicts short-term clinical outcome in heart failure patients with restrictive filling pattern. J Card Fail. 2008;14(5):420-5.
Feola, M., Aspromonte, N., Milani, L., Bobbio, M., Bardellotto, S., Barro, S., Giovinazzo, P., Noventa, F., & Valle, R. (2008). Plasma brain natriuretic peptide predicts short-term clinical outcome in heart failure patients with restrictive filling pattern. Journal of Cardiac Failure, 14(5), 420-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2008.01.013
Feola M, et al. Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Predicts Short-term Clinical Outcome in Heart Failure Patients With Restrictive Filling Pattern. J Card Fail. 2008;14(5):420-5. PubMed PMID: 18514935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma brain natriuretic peptide predicts short-term clinical outcome in heart failure patients with restrictive filling pattern. AU - Feola,Mauro, AU - Aspromonte,Nadia, AU - Milani,Loredano, AU - Bobbio,Marco, AU - Bardellotto,Stefania, AU - Barro,Sabrina, AU - Giovinazzo,Prospero, AU - Noventa,Federica, AU - Valle,Roberto, Y1 - 2008/05/27/ PY - 2007/09/10/received PY - 2008/01/23/revised PY - 2008/01/23/accepted PY - 2008/6/3/pubmed PY - 2008/9/23/medline PY - 2008/6/3/entrez SP - 420 EP - 5 JF - Journal of cardiac failure JO - J Card Fail VL - 14 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an important parameter of severity in congestive heart failure (CHF). We analyzed if BNP might stratify 6-month clinical outcome in outpatients with CHF with restrictive mitral filling pattern. METHODS: All subjects with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II to IV and restrictive filling pattern were enrolled at hospital discharge after an acute decompensation. NYHA class, BNP, and echocardiogram for the evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and diastolic function were analyzed. Death and hospital readmission for CHF were the clinical events observed. RESULTS: A total of 250 patients (66% were male, mean age 73 years) were enrolled. The mean NYHA class was 2.5 +/- 0.6, LVEF was 38% +/- 15%, and mean deceleration time was 120 +/- 16 ms. The mean BNP was 643 +/- 566 pg/mL. During the 6-month follow-up, 35 patients (14%) died and 106 patients (42.4%) were readmitted for CHF (event group); in 109 patients (43.6%) no events were observed (no-event group). Higher NYHA class (2.7 +/- 0.6 vs 2.4 +/- 0.6, P = .001) and reduced LVEF (34% +/- 13% vs 42% +/- 17%, P = .01) but similar deceleration time (119 +/- 16 ms vs 122 +/- 17 ms, P = not significant) were observed in the event group. A higher level of mean BNP (833 +/- 604 pg/mL vs 397 +/- 396 pg/mL, P = .01) was recorded in the event group. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed that LVEF (P = .04), NYHA class (P = .02), and plasma BNP (P = .0001) were associated with adverse short-term clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: Patients with CHF with a restrictive diastolic pattern had poor short-term clinical outcome. NYHA class and LVEF at discharge might predict cardiovascular events, but plasma BNP proved to be the strongest predictor. SN - 1532-8414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18514935/Plasma_brain_natriuretic_peptide_predicts_short_term_clinical_outcome_in_heart_failure_patients_with_restrictive_filling_pattern_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1071-9164(08)00041-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -