Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The role of biofeedback in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders.

Abstract

Biofeedback is a form of treatment that has no adverse effects and can be provided by physician extenders. The therapy relies on patients' ability to learn how to influence their bodily functions through dedicated machinery and teaching. This Review provides a comprehensive overview of all potential therapeutic applications of biofeedback for functional constipation, fecal incontinence, functional anorectal pain, IBS, functional dyspepsia, and aerophagia. Practical clinical applications of biofeedback therapy supported by randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) are limited to fecal incontinence and dyssynergic defecation. For fecal incontinence, RCTs suggest that biofeedback combining strength training and sensory discrimination training is effective in approximately 75% of patients and is more effective than placebo. However, verbal feedback provided by a therapist during extended digital examination may be equally effective, and children whose fecal incontinence is associated with constipation plus fecal impaction do no better with biofeedback than medical management. For dyssynergic defecation, RCTs show that biofeedback combining pelvic floor muscle relaxation training, practice in defecating a water-filled balloon, and instruction in effective straining is effective in approximately 70% of patients who have failed to respond to laxative treatment. For both incontinence and dyssynergic defecation, the benefits of biofeedback last at least 12 months.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7080, USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Aerophagy
    Biofeedback, Psychology
    Dyspepsia
    Fecal Incontinence
    Gastrointestinal Diseases
    Humans
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18521115

    Citation

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe, and William E. Whitehead. "The Role of Biofeedback in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders." Nature Clinical Practice. Gastroenterology & Hepatology, vol. 5, no. 7, 2008, pp. 371-82.
    Chiarioni G, Whitehead WE. The role of biofeedback in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Nat Clin Pract Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008;5(7):371-82.
    Chiarioni, G., & Whitehead, W. E. (2008). The role of biofeedback in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Nature Clinical Practice. Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 5(7), pp. 371-82. doi:10.1038/ncpgasthep1150.
    Chiarioni G, Whitehead WE. The Role of Biofeedback in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders. Nat Clin Pract Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008;5(7):371-82. PubMed PMID: 18521115.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The role of biofeedback in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. AU - Chiarioni,Giuseppe, AU - Whitehead,William E, Y1 - 2008/06/03/ PY - 2008/01/09/received PY - 2008/03/13/accepted PY - 2008/6/4/pubmed PY - 2008/8/1/medline PY - 2008/6/4/entrez SP - 371 EP - 82 JF - Nature clinical practice. Gastroenterology & hepatology JO - Nat Clin Pract Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 5 IS - 7 N2 - Biofeedback is a form of treatment that has no adverse effects and can be provided by physician extenders. The therapy relies on patients' ability to learn how to influence their bodily functions through dedicated machinery and teaching. This Review provides a comprehensive overview of all potential therapeutic applications of biofeedback for functional constipation, fecal incontinence, functional anorectal pain, IBS, functional dyspepsia, and aerophagia. Practical clinical applications of biofeedback therapy supported by randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) are limited to fecal incontinence and dyssynergic defecation. For fecal incontinence, RCTs suggest that biofeedback combining strength training and sensory discrimination training is effective in approximately 75% of patients and is more effective than placebo. However, verbal feedback provided by a therapist during extended digital examination may be equally effective, and children whose fecal incontinence is associated with constipation plus fecal impaction do no better with biofeedback than medical management. For dyssynergic defecation, RCTs show that biofeedback combining pelvic floor muscle relaxation training, practice in defecating a water-filled balloon, and instruction in effective straining is effective in approximately 70% of patients who have failed to respond to laxative treatment. For both incontinence and dyssynergic defecation, the benefits of biofeedback last at least 12 months. SN - 1743-4386 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18521115/The_role_of_biofeedback_in_the_treatment_of_gastrointestinal_disorders_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncpgasthep1150 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -