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Shared psychopathology in obese subjects with and without binge-eating disorder.
Int J Eat Disord. 2008 Nov; 41(7):643-9.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate obese people with/without binge-eating Disorder (BED) in terms of shared psychopathological features pertaining to spectrum of eating disorders.

METHOD

One-hundred obese adult patients with a BMI > 30 kg/m(2) referred to an Eating Disorder Unit and/or hospital weight-loss programs were administered the BED Clinical Interview, the Eating Disorder Inventory, and the Structured Clinical Interview for Anorexic-Bulimic Spectrum, Self-Report.

RESULTS

Twenty-seven subjects satisfied DSM-IV research criteria for current BED; compared to nonbingeing obese subjects, BED ones were characterized by greater weight-shape concerns influencing self-esteem (p = .05), overall impairment due to the overweight condition (p < .005), psychological distress leading to professional help (p < .001), dichotomous reasoning (p = .01) and secondary social phobia due to the overweight condition (p < .005). Compared to the other group, BED obese subjects scored higher at the following EDI subscales: bulimia (p < .0001), ineffectiveness (p < .01), interoceptive awareness and social insecurity (p < .05).

CONCLUSION

The results of this study highlight the role of cognitive mechanisms such as dichotomous reasoning and weight-shape concerns unduly influencing self-esteem as a hallmark of BED in obese patients, and the importance of investigating eating disorder psychopathology by adopting a dimensional perspective, rather than strictly focusing on categories when dealing with obese patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Pharmacology, Neurobiology and Biotechnologies, Section of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Italy. carlarama2001@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18528872

Citation

Ramacciotti, Carla E., et al. "Shared Psychopathology in Obese Subjects With and Without Binge-eating Disorder." The International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 41, no. 7, 2008, pp. 643-9.
Ramacciotti CE, Coli E, Bondi E, et al. Shared psychopathology in obese subjects with and without binge-eating disorder. Int J Eat Disord. 2008;41(7):643-9.
Ramacciotti, C. E., Coli, E., Bondi, E., Burgalassi, A., Massimetti, G., & Dell'osso, L. (2008). Shared psychopathology in obese subjects with and without binge-eating disorder. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 41(7), 643-9. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.20544
Ramacciotti CE, et al. Shared Psychopathology in Obese Subjects With and Without Binge-eating Disorder. Int J Eat Disord. 2008;41(7):643-9. PubMed PMID: 18528872.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Shared psychopathology in obese subjects with and without binge-eating disorder. AU - Ramacciotti,Carla E, AU - Coli,Elisabetta, AU - Bondi,Emi, AU - Burgalassi,Annalisa, AU - Massimetti,Gabriele, AU - Dell'osso,Liliana, PY - 2008/6/6/pubmed PY - 2009/2/20/medline PY - 2008/6/6/entrez SP - 643 EP - 9 JF - The International journal of eating disorders JO - Int J Eat Disord VL - 41 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate obese people with/without binge-eating Disorder (BED) in terms of shared psychopathological features pertaining to spectrum of eating disorders. METHOD: One-hundred obese adult patients with a BMI > 30 kg/m(2) referred to an Eating Disorder Unit and/or hospital weight-loss programs were administered the BED Clinical Interview, the Eating Disorder Inventory, and the Structured Clinical Interview for Anorexic-Bulimic Spectrum, Self-Report. RESULTS: Twenty-seven subjects satisfied DSM-IV research criteria for current BED; compared to nonbingeing obese subjects, BED ones were characterized by greater weight-shape concerns influencing self-esteem (p = .05), overall impairment due to the overweight condition (p < .005), psychological distress leading to professional help (p < .001), dichotomous reasoning (p = .01) and secondary social phobia due to the overweight condition (p < .005). Compared to the other group, BED obese subjects scored higher at the following EDI subscales: bulimia (p < .0001), ineffectiveness (p < .01), interoceptive awareness and social insecurity (p < .05). CONCLUSION: The results of this study highlight the role of cognitive mechanisms such as dichotomous reasoning and weight-shape concerns unduly influencing self-esteem as a hallmark of BED in obese patients, and the importance of investigating eating disorder psychopathology by adopting a dimensional perspective, rather than strictly focusing on categories when dealing with obese patients. SN - 1098-108X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18528872/Shared_psychopathology_in_obese_subjects_with_and_without_binge_eating_disorder_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.20544 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -