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Effects of tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, on local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats.
J Surg Res. 2008 Oct; 149(2):259-71.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tempol is a stable piperidine nitroxide of low molecular weight that permeates biological membranes and scavenges superoxide anions in vitro. In a variety of animal models, deleterious effects of reperfusion injury on both local and remote organs have been demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, Tempol, on local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Male Wistar-albino rats were randomized into three groups: (I) Sham-operated control group, laparotomy without I/R injury (n = 12); (II) Intestinal I/R group, 60 min of ischemia by superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 2-h of reperfusion (n = 12); and (III) I/R + Tempol-treated group, identical to I/R group except for Tempol administration, 30 mg/kg bolus injection 5 min before reperfusion, followed by an infusion of 30 mg/kg/h intravenously (n = 12). Histopathologically, intestinal mucosal lesions were assessed by Chiu's classification, and pulmonary parenchymal damage was appraised by pulmonary neutrophil infiltration and acute lung injury scaling. Biochemically, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde, glutathione, and nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) levels were determined in both intestinal mucosa and lung parenchyma. Evans blue dye concentration and organ wet/dry weight ratios were used as a marker of organ edema. Animal survival was observed up to 1 week.

RESULTS

Intestinal mucosal lesions and pulmonary parenchymal damage were significantly attenuated with Tempol treatment, histopathologically (P < 0.05). Tempol administration significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels, and also significantly increased glutathione and NO(x) levels of both intestinal and lung tissues, biochemically (P < 0.05). Evans blue dye extravasation and wet/dry weight ratios of organs were significantly reduced with Tempol injection (P < 0.05). The survival rates of rats in Tempol-treated group were significantly higher than that of I/R-treated group (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

The present study suggests that Tempol administration significantly reduces both local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal I/R before and throughout the reperfusion period. Further clinical studies are needed to clarify whether Tempol may be a useful therapeutic agent to use in particular operations where the reperfusion injury occurs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, Pamukkale University, School of Medicine, Denizli, Turkey. zteke_md@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18533188

Citation

Teke, Zafer, et al. "Effects of Tempol, a Membrane-permeable Radical Scavenger, On Local and Remote Organ Injuries Caused By Intestinal Ischemia/reperfusion in Rats." The Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 149, no. 2, 2008, pp. 259-71.
Teke Z, Kabay B, Ozden A, et al. Effects of tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, on local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats. J Surg Res. 2008;149(2):259-71.
Teke, Z., Kabay, B., Ozden, A., Yenisey, C., Bir, F., Demirkan, N. C., Bicakci, T., & Erdem, E. (2008). Effects of tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, on local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats. The Journal of Surgical Research, 149(2), 259-71. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2007.12.791
Teke Z, et al. Effects of Tempol, a Membrane-permeable Radical Scavenger, On Local and Remote Organ Injuries Caused By Intestinal Ischemia/reperfusion in Rats. J Surg Res. 2008;149(2):259-71. PubMed PMID: 18533188.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, on local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats. AU - Teke,Zafer, AU - Kabay,Burhan, AU - Ozden,Akin, AU - Yenisey,Cigdem, AU - Bir,Ferda, AU - Demirkan,Nese Calli, AU - Bicakci,Tuncay, AU - Erdem,Ergun, Y1 - 2008/01/30/ PY - 2007/07/20/received PY - 2007/11/12/revised PY - 2007/12/19/accepted PY - 2008/6/6/pubmed PY - 2008/10/15/medline PY - 2008/6/6/entrez SP - 259 EP - 71 JF - The Journal of surgical research JO - J Surg Res VL - 149 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Tempol is a stable piperidine nitroxide of low molecular weight that permeates biological membranes and scavenges superoxide anions in vitro. In a variety of animal models, deleterious effects of reperfusion injury on both local and remote organs have been demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, Tempol, on local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar-albino rats were randomized into three groups: (I) Sham-operated control group, laparotomy without I/R injury (n = 12); (II) Intestinal I/R group, 60 min of ischemia by superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 2-h of reperfusion (n = 12); and (III) I/R + Tempol-treated group, identical to I/R group except for Tempol administration, 30 mg/kg bolus injection 5 min before reperfusion, followed by an infusion of 30 mg/kg/h intravenously (n = 12). Histopathologically, intestinal mucosal lesions were assessed by Chiu's classification, and pulmonary parenchymal damage was appraised by pulmonary neutrophil infiltration and acute lung injury scaling. Biochemically, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde, glutathione, and nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) levels were determined in both intestinal mucosa and lung parenchyma. Evans blue dye concentration and organ wet/dry weight ratios were used as a marker of organ edema. Animal survival was observed up to 1 week. RESULTS: Intestinal mucosal lesions and pulmonary parenchymal damage were significantly attenuated with Tempol treatment, histopathologically (P < 0.05). Tempol administration significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels, and also significantly increased glutathione and NO(x) levels of both intestinal and lung tissues, biochemically (P < 0.05). Evans blue dye extravasation and wet/dry weight ratios of organs were significantly reduced with Tempol injection (P < 0.05). The survival rates of rats in Tempol-treated group were significantly higher than that of I/R-treated group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that Tempol administration significantly reduces both local and remote organ injuries caused by intestinal I/R before and throughout the reperfusion period. Further clinical studies are needed to clarify whether Tempol may be a useful therapeutic agent to use in particular operations where the reperfusion injury occurs. SN - 1095-8673 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18533188/Effects_of_tempol_a_membrane_permeable_radical_scavenger_on_local_and_remote_organ_injuries_caused_by_intestinal_ischemia/reperfusion_in_rats_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -