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Common tinea infections in children.
Am Fam Physician 2008; 77(10):1415-20AF

Abstract

The common dermatophyte genera Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton are major causes of superficial fungal infections in children. These infections (e.g., tinea corporis, pedis, cruris, and unguium) are typically acquired directly from contact with infected humans or animals or indirectly from exposure to contaminated soil or fomites. A diagnosis usually can be made with a focused history, physical examination, and potassium hydroxide microscopy. Occasionally, Wood's lamp examination, fungal culture, or histologic tissue examination is required. Most tinea infections can be managed with topical therapies; oral treatment is reserved for tinea capitis, severe tinea pedis, and tinea unguium. Topical therapy with fungicidal allylamines may have slightly higher cure rates and shorter treatment courses than with fungistatic azoles. Although oral griseofulvin has been the standard treatment for tinea capitis, newer oral antifungal agents such as terbinafine, itraconazole, and fluconazole are effective, safe, and have shorter treatment courses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157-1084, USA. mandrews@wfubmc.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18533375

Citation

Andrews, Mark D., and Marianthe Burns. "Common Tinea Infections in Children." American Family Physician, vol. 77, no. 10, 2008, pp. 1415-20.
Andrews MD, Burns M. Common tinea infections in children. Am Fam Physician. 2008;77(10):1415-20.
Andrews, M. D., & Burns, M. (2008). Common tinea infections in children. American Family Physician, 77(10), pp. 1415-20.
Andrews MD, Burns M. Common Tinea Infections in Children. Am Fam Physician. 2008 May 15;77(10):1415-20. PubMed PMID: 18533375.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Common tinea infections in children. AU - Andrews,Mark D, AU - Burns,Marianthe, PY - 2008/6/7/pubmed PY - 2008/6/20/medline PY - 2008/6/7/entrez SP - 1415 EP - 20 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 77 IS - 10 N2 - The common dermatophyte genera Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton are major causes of superficial fungal infections in children. These infections (e.g., tinea corporis, pedis, cruris, and unguium) are typically acquired directly from contact with infected humans or animals or indirectly from exposure to contaminated soil or fomites. A diagnosis usually can be made with a focused history, physical examination, and potassium hydroxide microscopy. Occasionally, Wood's lamp examination, fungal culture, or histologic tissue examination is required. Most tinea infections can be managed with topical therapies; oral treatment is reserved for tinea capitis, severe tinea pedis, and tinea unguium. Topical therapy with fungicidal allylamines may have slightly higher cure rates and shorter treatment courses than with fungistatic azoles. Although oral griseofulvin has been the standard treatment for tinea capitis, newer oral antifungal agents such as terbinafine, itraconazole, and fluconazole are effective, safe, and have shorter treatment courses. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18533375/Common_tinea_infections_in_children_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=18533375 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -