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The art of seeing and painting.
Spat Vis. 2008; 21(3-5):463-86.SV

Abstract

The human urge to represent the three-dimensional world using two-dimensional pictorial representations dates back at least to Paleolithic times. Artists from ancient to modern times have struggled to understand how a few contours or color patches on a flat surface can induce mental representations of a three-dimensional scene. This article summarizes some of the recent breakthroughs in scientifically understanding how the brain sees that shed light on these struggles. These breakthroughs illustrate how various artists have intuitively understood paradoxical properties about how the brain sees, and have used that understanding to create great art. These paradoxical properties arise from how the brain forms the units of conscious visual perception; namely, representations of three-dimensional boundaries and surfaces. Boundaries and surfaces are computed in parallel cortical processing streams that obey computationally complementary properties. These streams interact at multiple levels to overcome their complementary weaknesses and to transform their complementary properties into consistent percepts. The article describes how properties of complementary consistency have guided the creation of many great works of art.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems and Center of Excellence for Learning in Education, Science, and Technology, Boston University, 677 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA. steve@bu.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18534115

Citation

Grossberg, Stephen. "The Art of Seeing and Painting." Spatial Vision, vol. 21, no. 3-5, 2008, pp. 463-86.
Grossberg S. The art of seeing and painting. Spat Vis. 2008;21(3-5):463-86.
Grossberg, S. (2008). The art of seeing and painting. Spatial Vision, 21(3-5), 463-86. https://doi.org/10.1163/156856808784532608
Grossberg S. The Art of Seeing and Painting. Spat Vis. 2008;21(3-5):463-86. PubMed PMID: 18534115.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The art of seeing and painting. A1 - Grossberg,Stephen, PY - 2008/6/7/pubmed PY - 2008/9/24/medline PY - 2008/6/7/entrez SP - 463 EP - 86 JF - Spatial vision JO - Spat Vis VL - 21 IS - 3-5 N2 - The human urge to represent the three-dimensional world using two-dimensional pictorial representations dates back at least to Paleolithic times. Artists from ancient to modern times have struggled to understand how a few contours or color patches on a flat surface can induce mental representations of a three-dimensional scene. This article summarizes some of the recent breakthroughs in scientifically understanding how the brain sees that shed light on these struggles. These breakthroughs illustrate how various artists have intuitively understood paradoxical properties about how the brain sees, and have used that understanding to create great art. These paradoxical properties arise from how the brain forms the units of conscious visual perception; namely, representations of three-dimensional boundaries and surfaces. Boundaries and surfaces are computed in parallel cortical processing streams that obey computationally complementary properties. These streams interact at multiple levels to overcome their complementary weaknesses and to transform their complementary properties into consistent percepts. The article describes how properties of complementary consistency have guided the creation of many great works of art. SN - 0169-1015 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18534115/The_art_of_seeing_and_painting_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=18534115.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -