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Antimicrobial activity of bacterial isolates from different floral sources of honey.
Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Aug 15; 126(1-2):240-4.IJ

Abstract

More than two thousand bacterial strains isolated from six US domestic honeys and two manuka honeys from New Zealand were screened for production of antimicrobial compounds. A high incidence of antimicrobial inhibition determined by deferred inhibition assays was observed with the bacterial isolates from all eight honey samples. In total, 2217 isolates out of 2398 strains (92.5% of total isolates) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least one of the tested microorganisms. Antifungal activity by bacterial isolates originating from the eight honeys ranged from 44.4% to 98.0%. Bacterial isolates from manuka honey (MH1) exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Bacillus cereus F4552, at 51.5% and 53.3% of the isolates, respectively. However, less than 30% of the bacterial isolates from the other manuka honey (MH2) and six domestic honey sources exhibited anti-Bacillus activity. Listeria monocytogenes F2-586 1053 showed higher overall rates of sensitivity to between 11 and 66% of the bacterial isolates. The high rate of antimicrobial activity exhibited by the bacterial strains isolated from different honey sources could provide potential sources of novel antimicrobial compounds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Technology, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Cornell University, 630 W. North St., Geneva, NY 14456, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18538876

Citation

Lee, Hyungjae, et al. "Antimicrobial Activity of Bacterial Isolates From Different Floral Sources of Honey." International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 126, no. 1-2, 2008, pp. 240-4.
Lee H, Churey JJ, Worobo RW. Antimicrobial activity of bacterial isolates from different floral sources of honey. Int J Food Microbiol. 2008;126(1-2):240-4.
Lee, H., Churey, J. J., & Worobo, R. W. (2008). Antimicrobial activity of bacterial isolates from different floral sources of honey. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 126(1-2), 240-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.04.030
Lee H, Churey JJ, Worobo RW. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacterial Isolates From Different Floral Sources of Honey. Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Aug 15;126(1-2):240-4. PubMed PMID: 18538876.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antimicrobial activity of bacterial isolates from different floral sources of honey. AU - Lee,Hyungjae, AU - Churey,John J, AU - Worobo,Randy W, Y1 - 2008/05/05/ PY - 2007/07/24/received PY - 2008/04/29/revised PY - 2008/04/30/accepted PY - 2008/6/10/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/6/10/entrez SP - 240 EP - 4 JF - International journal of food microbiology JO - Int. J. Food Microbiol. VL - 126 IS - 1-2 N2 - More than two thousand bacterial strains isolated from six US domestic honeys and two manuka honeys from New Zealand were screened for production of antimicrobial compounds. A high incidence of antimicrobial inhibition determined by deferred inhibition assays was observed with the bacterial isolates from all eight honey samples. In total, 2217 isolates out of 2398 strains (92.5% of total isolates) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least one of the tested microorganisms. Antifungal activity by bacterial isolates originating from the eight honeys ranged from 44.4% to 98.0%. Bacterial isolates from manuka honey (MH1) exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Bacillus cereus F4552, at 51.5% and 53.3% of the isolates, respectively. However, less than 30% of the bacterial isolates from the other manuka honey (MH2) and six domestic honey sources exhibited anti-Bacillus activity. Listeria monocytogenes F2-586 1053 showed higher overall rates of sensitivity to between 11 and 66% of the bacterial isolates. The high rate of antimicrobial activity exhibited by the bacterial strains isolated from different honey sources could provide potential sources of novel antimicrobial compounds. SN - 0168-1605 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18538876/Antimicrobial_activity_of_bacterial_isolates_from_different_floral_sources_of_honey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-1605(08)00231-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -