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Associations of substance use problems with intimate partner violence for at-risk men in long-term relationships.
J Fam Psychol. 2008 Jun; 22(3):429-38.JF

Abstract

Associations of substance use problems in men--defined as a man's meeting at least 1 criterion of dependence on each of a number of substances by his mid-20s--with their perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV) were examined in an at-risk community sample of 150 men in long-term relationships from their late adolescence to their late 20s. Men who had a problem with substances other than sedatives (especially cannabis and hallucinogens) committed more IPV than did men without such problems. Most of the men who had a problem with marijuana also had an alcohol problem, which explains why alcohol was found to have only an indirect association with IPV. The failure of previous alcohol-use studies to control for co-occurrence of alcohol and marijuana problems may explain the discrepancy with conclusions from past research that alcohol problems contribute directly to the perpetration of IPV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene, OR 97401, USA. alanf@oslc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18540771

Citation

Feingold, Alan, et al. "Associations of Substance Use Problems With Intimate Partner Violence for At-risk Men in Long-term Relationships." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 22, no. 3, 2008, pp. 429-38.
Feingold A, Kerr DC, Capaldi DM. Associations of substance use problems with intimate partner violence for at-risk men in long-term relationships. J Fam Psychol. 2008;22(3):429-38.
Feingold, A., Kerr, D. C., & Capaldi, D. M. (2008). Associations of substance use problems with intimate partner violence for at-risk men in long-term relationships. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 22(3), 429-38. https://doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.22.3.429
Feingold A, Kerr DC, Capaldi DM. Associations of Substance Use Problems With Intimate Partner Violence for At-risk Men in Long-term Relationships. J Fam Psychol. 2008;22(3):429-38. PubMed PMID: 18540771.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of substance use problems with intimate partner violence for at-risk men in long-term relationships. AU - Feingold,Alan, AU - Kerr,David C R, AU - Capaldi,Deborah M, PY - 2008/6/11/pubmed PY - 2008/8/22/medline PY - 2008/6/11/entrez SP - 429 EP - 38 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - Associations of substance use problems in men--defined as a man's meeting at least 1 criterion of dependence on each of a number of substances by his mid-20s--with their perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV) were examined in an at-risk community sample of 150 men in long-term relationships from their late adolescence to their late 20s. Men who had a problem with substances other than sedatives (especially cannabis and hallucinogens) committed more IPV than did men without such problems. Most of the men who had a problem with marijuana also had an alcohol problem, which explains why alcohol was found to have only an indirect association with IPV. The failure of previous alcohol-use studies to control for co-occurrence of alcohol and marijuana problems may explain the discrepancy with conclusions from past research that alcohol problems contribute directly to the perpetration of IPV. SN - 0893-3200 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18540771/Associations_of_substance_use_problems_with_intimate_partner_violence_for_at_risk_men_in_long_term_relationships_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/22/3/429 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -