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Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, is related to lower body mass index and waist circumference in free-living humans [corrected].
Nutrition 2008; 24(10):925-32N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Experimental trials using test meals suggest that water promotes satiety and decreases subsequent intake, thus possibly working to prevent obesity, when it is consumed as an integral component of a food, but not when consumed alone or alongside a food. We examined the associations of intake of water from beverages and intake of water from foods with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in free-living humans consuming self-selected diets.

METHODS

This observational cross-sectional study included 1136 female Japanese dietetic students 18-22 y of age. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated, self-administered, comprehensive, diet-history questionnaire. BMI was calculated using measured body height and weight. Waist circumference was measured at the level of the umbilicus.

RESULTS

Means +/- standard deviations of BMI, waist circumference, intake of water from beverages, and intake of water from foods were 21.3 +/- 2.7 kg/m(2), 72.9 +/- 7.1 cm, 569 +/- 318 g/1000 kcal, and 476 +/- 110 g/1000 kcal, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, intake of water from beverages was not associated with BMI (P for trend = 0.25) or waist circumference (P for trend = 0.43). Conversely, intake of water from foods showed independent and negative associations with BMI (P for trend = 0.030) and waist circumference (P for trend = 0.0003).

CONCLUSION

Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, was independently associated with lower BMI and waist circumference in free-living humans consuming self-selected diets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18547786

Citation

Murakami, Kentaro, et al. "Intake of Water From Foods, but Not Water From Beverages, Is Related to Lower Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference in Free-living Humans [corrected]." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 24, no. 10, 2008, pp. 925-32.
Murakami K, Sasaki S, Takahashi Y, et al. Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, is related to lower body mass index and waist circumference in free-living humans [corrected]. Nutrition. 2008;24(10):925-32.
Murakami, K., Sasaki, S., Takahashi, Y., & Uenishi, K. (2008). Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, is related to lower body mass index and waist circumference in free-living humans [corrected]. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 24(10), pp. 925-32. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2008.04.002.
Murakami K, et al. Intake of Water From Foods, but Not Water From Beverages, Is Related to Lower Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference in Free-living Humans [corrected]. Nutrition. 2008;24(10):925-32. PubMed PMID: 18547786.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, is related to lower body mass index and waist circumference in free-living humans [corrected]. AU - Murakami,Kentaro, AU - Sasaki,Satoshi, AU - Takahashi,Yoshiko, AU - Uenishi,Kazuhiro, AU - ,, Y1 - 2008/06/10/ PY - 2008/01/28/received PY - 2008/04/01/revised PY - 2008/04/11/accepted PY - 2008/6/13/pubmed PY - 2009/2/5/medline PY - 2008/6/13/entrez SP - 925 EP - 32 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 24 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Experimental trials using test meals suggest that water promotes satiety and decreases subsequent intake, thus possibly working to prevent obesity, when it is consumed as an integral component of a food, but not when consumed alone or alongside a food. We examined the associations of intake of water from beverages and intake of water from foods with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in free-living humans consuming self-selected diets. METHODS: This observational cross-sectional study included 1136 female Japanese dietetic students 18-22 y of age. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated, self-administered, comprehensive, diet-history questionnaire. BMI was calculated using measured body height and weight. Waist circumference was measured at the level of the umbilicus. RESULTS: Means +/- standard deviations of BMI, waist circumference, intake of water from beverages, and intake of water from foods were 21.3 +/- 2.7 kg/m(2), 72.9 +/- 7.1 cm, 569 +/- 318 g/1000 kcal, and 476 +/- 110 g/1000 kcal, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, intake of water from beverages was not associated with BMI (P for trend = 0.25) or waist circumference (P for trend = 0.43). Conversely, intake of water from foods showed independent and negative associations with BMI (P for trend = 0.030) and waist circumference (P for trend = 0.0003). CONCLUSION: Intake of water from foods, but not water from beverages, was independently associated with lower BMI and waist circumference in free-living humans consuming self-selected diets. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18547786/Intake_of_water_from_foods_but_not_water_from_beverages_is_related_to_lower_body_mass_index_and_waist_circumference_in_free_living_humans_[corrected]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(08)00201-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -