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Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: an independent predictor of coronary artery disease events in primary and secondary prevention.
Am J Cardiol. 2008 Jun 16; 101(12A):23F-33F.AJ

Abstract

In recent years, atherosclerosis has become recognized as an inflammatory disease whose activity can be assessed by circulating biomarkers. Along with C-reactive protein (CRP), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) may now be considered as a biomarker with sufficient accumulated evidence to support its application in clinical practice. Lp-PLA(2) is especially appealing because of its vascular specificity, which directly derives from its role in plaque pathophysiology. This article reviews the highlights of the >25 prospective epidemiologic studies now published on Lp-PLA(2) as a risk marker in primary or secondary prevention. These trials demonstrate generally consistent correlations between elevated Lp-PLA(2) levels and the increased risk for cardiovascular events, even after multivariable adjustment for traditional risk factors, with roughly a doubling of risk associated with upper quantile levels. Furthermore, Lp-PLA(2) as a risk predictor has been shown to be independent of and complementary to high-sensitivity CRP. These study results combined with recommendations from the American Heart Association/Centers for Disease Control (AHA/CDC) and the National Cholesterol Education Program III (NCEP III) suggest that Lp-PLA(2) might best be used in current clinical practice to refine risk prediction in those at intermediate cardiovascular risk. An increasingly prevalent group at intermediate risk shown to benefit from Lp-PLA(2) risk modification is the population with the cardiovascular metabolic syndrome, clinically identified as overweight patients with features of mixed dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, and hypertension. An additional application supported by these studies is further risk stratification of high- (often secondary-) risk patients into a group at very high risk, for whom a more aggressive target for low-density lipoprotein of <70 mg/dL (1 mg/dL = 0.02586 mmol/L) is now recommended as a reasonable therapeutic goal.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cardiovascular Department, LDS Hospital, University of Utah, 325 8th Avenue, Salt Lake City, UT 84143, USA. Jeffrey.Anderson@intermountainmail.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18549868

Citation

Anderson, Jeffrey L.. "Lipoprotein-associated Phospholipase A2: an Independent Predictor of Coronary Artery Disease Events in Primary and Secondary Prevention." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 101, no. 12A, 2008, 23F-33F.
Anderson JL. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: an independent predictor of coronary artery disease events in primary and secondary prevention. Am J Cardiol. 2008;101(12A):23F-33F.
Anderson, J. L. (2008). Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: an independent predictor of coronary artery disease events in primary and secondary prevention. The American Journal of Cardiology, 101(12A), 23F-33F. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.04.015
Anderson JL. Lipoprotein-associated Phospholipase A2: an Independent Predictor of Coronary Artery Disease Events in Primary and Secondary Prevention. Am J Cardiol. 2008 Jun 16;101(12A):23F-33F. PubMed PMID: 18549868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: an independent predictor of coronary artery disease events in primary and secondary prevention. A1 - Anderson,Jeffrey L, PY - 2008/7/25/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/7/25/entrez SP - 23F EP - 33F JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am. J. Cardiol. VL - 101 IS - 12A N2 - In recent years, atherosclerosis has become recognized as an inflammatory disease whose activity can be assessed by circulating biomarkers. Along with C-reactive protein (CRP), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) may now be considered as a biomarker with sufficient accumulated evidence to support its application in clinical practice. Lp-PLA(2) is especially appealing because of its vascular specificity, which directly derives from its role in plaque pathophysiology. This article reviews the highlights of the >25 prospective epidemiologic studies now published on Lp-PLA(2) as a risk marker in primary or secondary prevention. These trials demonstrate generally consistent correlations between elevated Lp-PLA(2) levels and the increased risk for cardiovascular events, even after multivariable adjustment for traditional risk factors, with roughly a doubling of risk associated with upper quantile levels. Furthermore, Lp-PLA(2) as a risk predictor has been shown to be independent of and complementary to high-sensitivity CRP. These study results combined with recommendations from the American Heart Association/Centers for Disease Control (AHA/CDC) and the National Cholesterol Education Program III (NCEP III) suggest that Lp-PLA(2) might best be used in current clinical practice to refine risk prediction in those at intermediate cardiovascular risk. An increasingly prevalent group at intermediate risk shown to benefit from Lp-PLA(2) risk modification is the population with the cardiovascular metabolic syndrome, clinically identified as overweight patients with features of mixed dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, and hypertension. An additional application supported by these studies is further risk stratification of high- (often secondary-) risk patients into a group at very high risk, for whom a more aggressive target for low-density lipoprotein of <70 mg/dL (1 mg/dL = 0.02586 mmol/L) is now recommended as a reasonable therapeutic goal. SN - 0002-9149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18549868/Lipoprotein_associated_phospholipase_A2:_an_independent_predictor_of_coronary_artery_disease_events_in_primary_and_secondary_prevention_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(08)00686-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -