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Obsessive-compulsive symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a multiracial/ethnic analysis of a student population.
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2008 Jun; 196(6):456-61.JN

Abstract

The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and the Padua Inventory Washington State University Revision are commonly used measures of obsessive-compulsive disorder. They have been shown to be reliable and valid with both clinical and nonclinical samples. However, their psychometrics have primarily been assessed using homogenous white samples. This is a concern because while some studies of anxiety measures among multiple racial and ethnic groups suggest equivalence (e.g., Norton, J Anxiety Dis. 2005;19:699-707), others report significant racial/ethnic differences and unequal predictive validity (e.g., Thomas et al., Assessment. 2000;7:247-258). This study examined 2 measures of obsessive-compulsive symptoms using a large sample of African American, white, Hispanic/Latino, Southeast Asian, and South Asian/East Indian students. Preliminary analyses indicated that Southeast and South Asian/East Indian participants reported significantly more symptoms on the Padua Inventory Washington State University Revision, although only South Asian/East Indian participants also reported a correspondingly higher rate of interference and distress associated with their symptoms. Comparable psychometric estimates were observed across all groups. Differences by race/ethnicity are discussed regarding potential variables that may act as moderators or mediators in addition to clinical and research implications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-5022, USA. pnorton@uh.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18552622

Citation

Washington, Christi S., et al. "Obsessive-compulsive Symptoms and Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: a Multiracial/ethnic Analysis of a Student Population." The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. 196, no. 6, 2008, pp. 456-61.
Washington CS, Norton PJ, Temple S. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a multiracial/ethnic analysis of a student population. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2008;196(6):456-61.
Washington, C. S., Norton, P. J., & Temple, S. (2008). Obsessive-compulsive symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a multiracial/ethnic analysis of a student population. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 196(6), 456-61. https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181775a62
Washington CS, Norton PJ, Temple S. Obsessive-compulsive Symptoms and Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: a Multiracial/ethnic Analysis of a Student Population. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2008;196(6):456-61. PubMed PMID: 18552622.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obsessive-compulsive symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a multiracial/ethnic analysis of a student population. AU - Washington,Christi S, AU - Norton,Peter J, AU - Temple,Samuel, PY - 2008/6/17/pubmed PY - 2008/6/26/medline PY - 2008/6/17/entrez SP - 456 EP - 61 JF - The Journal of nervous and mental disease JO - J Nerv Ment Dis VL - 196 IS - 6 N2 - The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and the Padua Inventory Washington State University Revision are commonly used measures of obsessive-compulsive disorder. They have been shown to be reliable and valid with both clinical and nonclinical samples. However, their psychometrics have primarily been assessed using homogenous white samples. This is a concern because while some studies of anxiety measures among multiple racial and ethnic groups suggest equivalence (e.g., Norton, J Anxiety Dis. 2005;19:699-707), others report significant racial/ethnic differences and unequal predictive validity (e.g., Thomas et al., Assessment. 2000;7:247-258). This study examined 2 measures of obsessive-compulsive symptoms using a large sample of African American, white, Hispanic/Latino, Southeast Asian, and South Asian/East Indian students. Preliminary analyses indicated that Southeast and South Asian/East Indian participants reported significantly more symptoms on the Padua Inventory Washington State University Revision, although only South Asian/East Indian participants also reported a correspondingly higher rate of interference and distress associated with their symptoms. Comparable psychometric estimates were observed across all groups. Differences by race/ethnicity are discussed regarding potential variables that may act as moderators or mediators in addition to clinical and research implications. SN - 1539-736X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18552622/Obsessive_compulsive_symptoms_and_obsessive_compulsive_disorder:_a_multiracial/ethnic_analysis_of_a_student_population_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181775a62 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -