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Challenges for research on polyphenols from foods in Alzheimer's disease: bioavailability, metabolism, and cellular and molecular mechanisms.
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Jul 09; 56(13):4855-73.JA

Abstract

Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in diet. Indeed, fruits, vegetables, beverages (tea, wine, juices), plants, and some herbs are loaded with powerful antioxidant polyphenols. Despite their wide distribution, research on human health benefits truly began in the mid-1990s (Scalbert, A.; Johnson, I. T.; Saltmarsh, M. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2005, 81, S15S-217S). Phenolic compounds have been receiving increasing interest from consumers and manufacturers because numerous epidemiological studies have suggested associations between consumption of polyphenol-rich foods or beverages and the prevention of certain chronic diseases such as cancers and cardiovascular diseases (Manach, C.; Mazur, A.; Scalbert, A. Curr. Opin. Lipidol. 2005, 16, 77-84; Duthie, S. J. Mol. Nutr. Food Res. 2007, 51, 665-674). Furthermore, in the past 10 years, research on the neuroprotective effects of dietary polyphenols has developed considerably. These compounds are able to protect neuronal cells in various in vivo and in vitro models through different intracellular targets (Ramassamy, C. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 2006, 545, 51-64). However, it is not at all clear whether these compounds reach the brain in sufficient concentrations and in a biologically active form to exert beneficial effects. On the other hand, it has become clear that the mechanisms of action of these polyphenols go beyond their antioxidant activity and the attenuation of oxidative stress. Therefore, there is a need for more research on their intracellular and molecular targets as special pathways underlying distinct polyphenol-induced neuroprotection. The focus of this review is aimed at presenting the role of some polyphenols from fruits, vegetables, and beverages in neuroprotection and particularly in Alzheimer's disease and the research challenges in this area.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531 Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Québec H7V 1B7, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18557624

Citation

Singh, Manjeet, et al. "Challenges for Research On Polyphenols From Foods in Alzheimer's Disease: Bioavailability, Metabolism, and Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 56, no. 13, 2008, pp. 4855-73.
Singh M, Arseneault M, Sanderson T, et al. Challenges for research on polyphenols from foods in Alzheimer's disease: bioavailability, metabolism, and cellular and molecular mechanisms. J Agric Food Chem. 2008;56(13):4855-73.
Singh, M., Arseneault, M., Sanderson, T., Murthy, V., & Ramassamy, C. (2008). Challenges for research on polyphenols from foods in Alzheimer's disease: bioavailability, metabolism, and cellular and molecular mechanisms. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 56(13), 4855-73. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf0735073
Singh M, et al. Challenges for Research On Polyphenols From Foods in Alzheimer's Disease: Bioavailability, Metabolism, and Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms. J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Jul 9;56(13):4855-73. PubMed PMID: 18557624.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Challenges for research on polyphenols from foods in Alzheimer's disease: bioavailability, metabolism, and cellular and molecular mechanisms. AU - Singh,Manjeet, AU - Arseneault,Madeleine, AU - Sanderson,Thomas, AU - Murthy,Ven, AU - Ramassamy,Charles, Y1 - 2008/06/17/ PY - 2008/6/19/pubmed PY - 2008/9/3/medline PY - 2008/6/19/entrez SP - 4855 EP - 73 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 56 IS - 13 N2 - Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in diet. Indeed, fruits, vegetables, beverages (tea, wine, juices), plants, and some herbs are loaded with powerful antioxidant polyphenols. Despite their wide distribution, research on human health benefits truly began in the mid-1990s (Scalbert, A.; Johnson, I. T.; Saltmarsh, M. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2005, 81, S15S-217S). Phenolic compounds have been receiving increasing interest from consumers and manufacturers because numerous epidemiological studies have suggested associations between consumption of polyphenol-rich foods or beverages and the prevention of certain chronic diseases such as cancers and cardiovascular diseases (Manach, C.; Mazur, A.; Scalbert, A. Curr. Opin. Lipidol. 2005, 16, 77-84; Duthie, S. J. Mol. Nutr. Food Res. 2007, 51, 665-674). Furthermore, in the past 10 years, research on the neuroprotective effects of dietary polyphenols has developed considerably. These compounds are able to protect neuronal cells in various in vivo and in vitro models through different intracellular targets (Ramassamy, C. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 2006, 545, 51-64). However, it is not at all clear whether these compounds reach the brain in sufficient concentrations and in a biologically active form to exert beneficial effects. On the other hand, it has become clear that the mechanisms of action of these polyphenols go beyond their antioxidant activity and the attenuation of oxidative stress. Therefore, there is a need for more research on their intracellular and molecular targets as special pathways underlying distinct polyphenol-induced neuroprotection. The focus of this review is aimed at presenting the role of some polyphenols from fruits, vegetables, and beverages in neuroprotection and particularly in Alzheimer's disease and the research challenges in this area. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18557624/Challenges_for_research_on_polyphenols_from_foods_in_Alzheimer's_disease:_bioavailability_metabolism_and_cellular_and_molecular_mechanisms_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf0735073 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -