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Dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid are more effective than alpha-linolenic acid in improving insulin sensitivity in rats.
Ann Nutr Metab. 2008; 52(3):250-6.AN

Abstract

In the present study, we investigated whether long-term administration of high dose of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is able to mimic the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or a mixture of both with respect to insulin sensitivity in male Wistar rats. Furthermore, we intended to test whether these n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reveal differential effects on glucose and insulin levels. As a result, plasma glucose and insulin levels were lowered by 35 and 38%, respectively, in the EPA and DHA group compared to the ALA group. Insulin sensitivity was substantially improved, as indicated by a 60% decreased HOMA index after an 8-week EPA and DHA administration, as compared to the effect observed for feeding ALA. However, insulin sensitivity did not differ between animals of the EPA and the DHA group. These results demonstrate that ALA intake at the expense of EPA and DHA in a diet high in n-3 fatty acids does not represent an alternative to raising oily fish consumption with regard to insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, a differential effect of the members of the n-3 family was shown for ALA compared to EPA and DHA, but EPA and DHA revealed comparable effects on insulin sensitivity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fur Lebensmittelchemie, Garching, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18562792

Citation

Andersen, Gaby, et al. "Dietary Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Are More Effective Than Alpha-linolenic Acid in Improving Insulin Sensitivity in Rats." Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 52, no. 3, 2008, pp. 250-6.
Andersen G, Harnack K, Erbersdobler HF, et al. Dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid are more effective than alpha-linolenic acid in improving insulin sensitivity in rats. Ann Nutr Metab. 2008;52(3):250-6.
Andersen, G., Harnack, K., Erbersdobler, H. F., & Somoza, V. (2008). Dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid are more effective than alpha-linolenic acid in improving insulin sensitivity in rats. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 52(3), 250-6. https://doi.org/10.1159/000140518
Andersen G, et al. Dietary Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Are More Effective Than Alpha-linolenic Acid in Improving Insulin Sensitivity in Rats. Ann Nutr Metab. 2008;52(3):250-6. PubMed PMID: 18562792.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid are more effective than alpha-linolenic acid in improving insulin sensitivity in rats. AU - Andersen,Gaby, AU - Harnack,Kerstin, AU - Erbersdobler,Helmut F, AU - Somoza,Veronika, Y1 - 2008/06/19/ PY - 2007/08/28/received PY - 2008/02/01/accepted PY - 2008/6/20/pubmed PY - 2008/9/4/medline PY - 2008/6/20/entrez SP - 250 EP - 6 JF - Annals of nutrition & metabolism JO - Ann Nutr Metab VL - 52 IS - 3 N2 - In the present study, we investigated whether long-term administration of high dose of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is able to mimic the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or a mixture of both with respect to insulin sensitivity in male Wistar rats. Furthermore, we intended to test whether these n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reveal differential effects on glucose and insulin levels. As a result, plasma glucose and insulin levels were lowered by 35 and 38%, respectively, in the EPA and DHA group compared to the ALA group. Insulin sensitivity was substantially improved, as indicated by a 60% decreased HOMA index after an 8-week EPA and DHA administration, as compared to the effect observed for feeding ALA. However, insulin sensitivity did not differ between animals of the EPA and the DHA group. These results demonstrate that ALA intake at the expense of EPA and DHA in a diet high in n-3 fatty acids does not represent an alternative to raising oily fish consumption with regard to insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, a differential effect of the members of the n-3 family was shown for ALA compared to EPA and DHA, but EPA and DHA revealed comparable effects on insulin sensitivity. SN - 1421-9697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18562792/Dietary_eicosapentaenoic_acid_and_docosahexaenoic_acid_are_more_effective_than_alpha_linolenic_acid_in_improving_insulin_sensitivity_in_rats_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000140518 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -