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Dengue vaccines for travelers.
Expert Rev Vaccines. 2008 Jul; 7(5):569-78.ER

Abstract

Dengue is an arthropod-borne infection caused by a flavivirus and spread by the Aedes mosquitoes. Many of the countries where dengue is endemic are popular tourist destinations and the disease is an increasingly important problem encountered by international travelers. Personal protection against the day-feeding dengue vectors is problematic, indicating the urgent need for a dengue vaccine. This review discusses the challenges of vaccine development, current vaccine strategies and the prospects for the availability of a vaccine for travelers in the future. Cost-effectiveness studies will need to take into account many factors, including the attack rate of dengue in travelers, the proportion of travelers who will need hospitalization, the cost of altered travel itineraries, the cost of the vaccine, duration of travel, destination and season. To be licensed as a travelers' vaccine, vaccine trials must address safety, immunogenicity, duration of protection, schedules and boosters in adults (in particular in immunologically naive adults), trials that may differ from those conducted in endemic countries. Vaccine schedules with long intervals would be a major obstacle to the uptake of the vaccine by travelers. Enhanced reactogenicity or interference with immunization must be effectively excluded for travelers with prior or concurrent vaccination against other flaviviruses, such as yellow fever or Japanese encephalitis. Licensing dengue as a travelers' vaccine poses unique challenges beyond the development of a vaccine for the endemic population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Travelers' Screening and Vaccination Clinic, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge Road, 119076 Singapore. epvws@pacific.net.sgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18564012

Citation

Wilder-Smith, Annelies, and Jacqueline L. Deen. "Dengue Vaccines for Travelers." Expert Review of Vaccines, vol. 7, no. 5, 2008, pp. 569-78.
Wilder-Smith A, Deen JL. Dengue vaccines for travelers. Expert Rev Vaccines. 2008;7(5):569-78.
Wilder-Smith, A., & Deen, J. L. (2008). Dengue vaccines for travelers. Expert Review of Vaccines, 7(5), 569-78. https://doi.org/10.1586/14760584.7.5.569
Wilder-Smith A, Deen JL. Dengue Vaccines for Travelers. Expert Rev Vaccines. 2008;7(5):569-78. PubMed PMID: 18564012.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dengue vaccines for travelers. AU - Wilder-Smith,Annelies, AU - Deen,Jacqueline L, PY - 2008/6/20/pubmed PY - 2008/8/16/medline PY - 2008/6/20/entrez SP - 569 EP - 78 JF - Expert review of vaccines JO - Expert Rev Vaccines VL - 7 IS - 5 N2 - Dengue is an arthropod-borne infection caused by a flavivirus and spread by the Aedes mosquitoes. Many of the countries where dengue is endemic are popular tourist destinations and the disease is an increasingly important problem encountered by international travelers. Personal protection against the day-feeding dengue vectors is problematic, indicating the urgent need for a dengue vaccine. This review discusses the challenges of vaccine development, current vaccine strategies and the prospects for the availability of a vaccine for travelers in the future. Cost-effectiveness studies will need to take into account many factors, including the attack rate of dengue in travelers, the proportion of travelers who will need hospitalization, the cost of altered travel itineraries, the cost of the vaccine, duration of travel, destination and season. To be licensed as a travelers' vaccine, vaccine trials must address safety, immunogenicity, duration of protection, schedules and boosters in adults (in particular in immunologically naive adults), trials that may differ from those conducted in endemic countries. Vaccine schedules with long intervals would be a major obstacle to the uptake of the vaccine by travelers. Enhanced reactogenicity or interference with immunization must be effectively excluded for travelers with prior or concurrent vaccination against other flaviviruses, such as yellow fever or Japanese encephalitis. Licensing dengue as a travelers' vaccine poses unique challenges beyond the development of a vaccine for the endemic population. SN - 1744-8395 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18564012/Dengue_vaccines_for_travelers_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/14760584.7.5.569 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -