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Poor utility of the age of onset criterion for DSM-IV attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Sep; 49(9):942-9.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To test whether the retrospective reporting of the age of onset impairment criterion for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) required in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - IV (DSM-IV) complicates identification of new and known child and adolescent cases later in life.

METHODS

A birth-records-based cohort of twins assessed at ages 7 to 19 years were blindly reassessed five years later using the MAGIC interview. Study outcome measures were differences in reported ages of onset for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD) and major depressive disorder (MDD).

RESULTS

For all age groups and respondents (parent on youth or youth self-report), later ages of ADHD onset were reported five years later. The same phenomenon was also present for the other diagnostic groups. Of the initial ADHD individuals who continued to meet all other ADHD criteria at follow-up, 46% failed the age of onset criterion five years later. When ignoring the age of onset criterion, late onsets of ages 7-16 years accounted for about 10% of all ADHD.

CONCLUSIONS

Use of the DSM-IV age of onset criterion for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the assessment of adolescents and young adults results in under-identification of affected individuals. Consideration should be given to revising the current nomenclatures to reflect the reality of retrospective reporting errors in age of onset as well as the presence of late onset cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. toddr@wustl.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18564071

Citation

Todd, Richard D., et al. "Poor Utility of the Age of Onset Criterion for DSM-IV Attention Deficit/hyperactivity Disorder: Recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 49, no. 9, 2008, pp. 942-9.
Todd RD, Huang H, Henderson CA. Poor utility of the age of onset criterion for DSM-IV attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008;49(9):942-9.
Todd, R. D., Huang, H., & Henderson, C. A. (2008). Poor utility of the age of onset criterion for DSM-IV attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 49(9), 942-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01892.x
Todd RD, Huang H, Henderson CA. Poor Utility of the Age of Onset Criterion for DSM-IV Attention Deficit/hyperactivity Disorder: Recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008;49(9):942-9. PubMed PMID: 18564071.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Poor utility of the age of onset criterion for DSM-IV attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11. AU - Todd,Richard D, AU - Huang,Hongyan, AU - Henderson,Cynthia A, Y1 - 2008/06/28/ PY - 2008/6/20/pubmed PY - 2009/3/17/medline PY - 2008/6/20/entrez SP - 942 EP - 9 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 49 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: To test whether the retrospective reporting of the age of onset impairment criterion for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) required in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - IV (DSM-IV) complicates identification of new and known child and adolescent cases later in life. METHODS: A birth-records-based cohort of twins assessed at ages 7 to 19 years were blindly reassessed five years later using the MAGIC interview. Study outcome measures were differences in reported ages of onset for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). RESULTS: For all age groups and respondents (parent on youth or youth self-report), later ages of ADHD onset were reported five years later. The same phenomenon was also present for the other diagnostic groups. Of the initial ADHD individuals who continued to meet all other ADHD criteria at follow-up, 46% failed the age of onset criterion five years later. When ignoring the age of onset criterion, late onsets of ages 7-16 years accounted for about 10% of all ADHD. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the DSM-IV age of onset criterion for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the assessment of adolescents and young adults results in under-identification of affected individuals. Consideration should be given to revising the current nomenclatures to reflect the reality of retrospective reporting errors in age of onset as well as the presence of late onset cases. SN - 1469-7610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18564071/Poor_utility_of_the_age_of_onset_criterion_for_DSM_IV_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder:_recommendations_for_DSM_V_and_ICD_11_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01892.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -