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Gymnophalloides seoi eggs from the stool of a 17th century female mummy found in Hadong, Republic of Korea.
J Parasitol. 2008 Apr; 94(2):467-72.JP

Abstract

It was previously reported that paleoparasitological clues for parasites infecting humans could be found in the feces of mummies of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) in the Republic of Korea. Here, we report the presence of trematode eggs, including Clonorchis sinensis, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Gymnophalloides seoi (a human parasite known in Korea since 1993) in the feces of a recently excavated female mummy in Hadong, Republic of Korea. This is the first report of the discovery of a G. seoi infection in a human mummy. Since Hadong is currently not an endemic area for G. seoi, we speculate that the parasite might have occurred frequently along coastal areas of the Korean peninsula several hundred years ago and that the endemic areas contracted to, more or less, restricted regions since that time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Chonan 330-714, South Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18564747

Citation

Seo, Min, et al. "Gymnophalloides Seoi Eggs From the Stool of a 17th Century Female Mummy Found in Hadong, Republic of Korea." The Journal of Parasitology, vol. 94, no. 2, 2008, pp. 467-72.
Seo M, Shin DH, Guk SM, et al. Gymnophalloides seoi eggs from the stool of a 17th century female mummy found in Hadong, Republic of Korea. J Parasitol. 2008;94(2):467-72.
Seo, M., Shin, D. H., Guk, S. M., Oh, C. S., Lee, E. J., Shin, M. H., Kim, M. J., Lee, S. D., Kim, Y. S., Yi, Y. S., Spigelman, M., & Chai, J. Y. (2008). Gymnophalloides seoi eggs from the stool of a 17th century female mummy found in Hadong, Republic of Korea. The Journal of Parasitology, 94(2), 467-72. https://doi.org/10.1645/GE-1365.1
Seo M, et al. Gymnophalloides Seoi Eggs From the Stool of a 17th Century Female Mummy Found in Hadong, Republic of Korea. J Parasitol. 2008;94(2):467-72. PubMed PMID: 18564747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gymnophalloides seoi eggs from the stool of a 17th century female mummy found in Hadong, Republic of Korea. AU - Seo,Min, AU - Shin,Dong Hoon, AU - Guk,Sang-Mee, AU - Oh,Chang Seok, AU - Lee,Eun-Joo, AU - Shin,Myung Ho, AU - Kim,Myeung Ju, AU - Lee,Soong Deok, AU - Kim,Yi-Suk, AU - Yi,Yang Su, AU - Spigelman,Mark, AU - Chai,Jong-Yil, PY - 2008/6/21/pubmed PY - 2008/7/2/medline PY - 2008/6/21/entrez SP - 467 EP - 72 JF - The Journal of parasitology JO - J. Parasitol. VL - 94 IS - 2 N2 - It was previously reported that paleoparasitological clues for parasites infecting humans could be found in the feces of mummies of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) in the Republic of Korea. Here, we report the presence of trematode eggs, including Clonorchis sinensis, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Gymnophalloides seoi (a human parasite known in Korea since 1993) in the feces of a recently excavated female mummy in Hadong, Republic of Korea. This is the first report of the discovery of a G. seoi infection in a human mummy. Since Hadong is currently not an endemic area for G. seoi, we speculate that the parasite might have occurred frequently along coastal areas of the Korean peninsula several hundred years ago and that the endemic areas contracted to, more or less, restricted regions since that time. SN - 0022-3395 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18564747/Gymnophalloides_seoi_eggs_from_the_stool_of_a_17th_century_female_mummy_found_in_Hadong_Republic_of_Korea_ L2 - http://www.journalofparasitology.org/doi/10.1645/GE-1365.1?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -