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Stigmatization experienced by rural-to-urban migrant workers in China: findings from a qualitative study.
World Health Popul. 2007 Dec; 9(4):29-43.WH

Abstract

Global literature has suggested a potential negative impact of social stigma on both physical and mental health among those who are being stigmatized. However, limited data are available regarding the form of stigma and stigmatization against rural-to-urban migrant workers in developing countries, including China. This study, employing qualitative data collected from focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews with rural-to-urban migrants in Beijing, China, was designed to understand the forms and context of stigmatization against rural migrant workers. The data in the current study show that rural-to-urban migrant workers in China had experienced various forms of stigmatization including labelling, stereotyping, separation, status loss and discrimination. Stigmatization occurred through different contexts of migrant workers' lives in urban destinations, including employment seeking, workplace benefits, and access to health and other public services. The current study is a necessary first step to assess the potential impact of stigmatization on both the physical and psychological well-being of rural-to-urban migrant workers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Prevention Research Center, Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201-2196, USA. xiaoming_li@wayne.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18567950

Citation

Li, Xiaoming, et al. "Stigmatization Experienced By Rural-to-urban Migrant Workers in China: Findings From a Qualitative Study." World Health & Population, vol. 9, no. 4, 2007, pp. 29-43.
Li X, Zhang L, Fang X, et al. Stigmatization experienced by rural-to-urban migrant workers in China: findings from a qualitative study. World Health Popul. 2007;9(4):29-43.
Li, X., Zhang, L., Fang, X., Xiong, Q., Chen, X., Lin, D., Mathur, A., & Stanton, B. (2007). Stigmatization experienced by rural-to-urban migrant workers in China: findings from a qualitative study. World Health & Population, 9(4), 29-43.
Li X, et al. Stigmatization Experienced By Rural-to-urban Migrant Workers in China: Findings From a Qualitative Study. World Health Popul. 2007;9(4):29-43. PubMed PMID: 18567950.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stigmatization experienced by rural-to-urban migrant workers in China: findings from a qualitative study. AU - Li,Xiaoming, AU - Zhang,Liying, AU - Fang,Xiaoyi, AU - Xiong,Qing, AU - Chen,Xinguang, AU - Lin,Danhua, AU - Mathur,Ambika, AU - Stanton,Bonita, PY - 2008/6/24/pubmed PY - 2008/7/30/medline PY - 2008/6/24/entrez SP - 29 EP - 43 JF - World health & population JO - World Health Popul VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - Global literature has suggested a potential negative impact of social stigma on both physical and mental health among those who are being stigmatized. However, limited data are available regarding the form of stigma and stigmatization against rural-to-urban migrant workers in developing countries, including China. This study, employing qualitative data collected from focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews with rural-to-urban migrants in Beijing, China, was designed to understand the forms and context of stigmatization against rural migrant workers. The data in the current study show that rural-to-urban migrant workers in China had experienced various forms of stigmatization including labelling, stereotyping, separation, status loss and discrimination. Stigmatization occurred through different contexts of migrant workers' lives in urban destinations, including employment seeking, workplace benefits, and access to health and other public services. The current study is a necessary first step to assess the potential impact of stigmatization on both the physical and psychological well-being of rural-to-urban migrant workers. SN - 1718-3340 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18567950/Stigmatization_experienced_by_rural_to_urban_migrant_workers_in_China:_findings_from_a_qualitative_study_ L2 - http://www.longwoods.com/product.php?productid=19515 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -