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Smoking and the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2008 May-Jun; 15(3):155-61.OE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To assess the association between smoking and the long-term incidence of cataract and cataract surgery.

METHODS

In a population-based cohort of Australians aged 49 years and over, 3654 participants were seen at baseline (1992-94) and 2406 were seen after 5- and/or 10-years and had photographs taken to assess incident cataract. Smoking status was recorded at interview. History, physical examination and fasting blood samples provided data on possible risk factors. Cataract incidence was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier survival approach. Discrete linear logistic models were used to assess risk of incident cataract.

RESULTS

After controlling for age, sex and other factors, ever smokers had an increased risk of developing nuclear cataract compared to never smokers (relative risk (RR) 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.83; RR 1.37, CI 1.04-1.81 for past smoking and RR 1.57, CI 1.06-2.31 for current smoking). The effect of smoking was strongest in ever smokers reporting 36 + pack-years of smoking compared to never smokers (RR 1.46; CI, 1.02-2.08). Current smokers also developed nuclear cataract slightly younger than non-smokers (mean age 65.2 versus 67.5 years, p = 0.049). No statistically significant associations were found between smoking status and the incidence of cortical or posterior subcapsular cataract, or cataract surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

These epidemiological data confirm smoking as a modest risk factor for the development of nuclear cataract.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18569810

Citation

Tan, Jennifer S L., et al. "Smoking and the Long-term Incidence of Cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study." Ophthalmic Epidemiology, vol. 15, no. 3, 2008, pp. 155-61.
Tan JS, Wang JJ, Younan C, et al. Smoking and the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2008;15(3):155-61.
Tan, J. S., Wang, J. J., Younan, C., Cumming, R. G., Rochtchina, E., & Mitchell, P. (2008). Smoking and the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmic Epidemiology, 15(3), 155-61. https://doi.org/10.1080/09286580701840362
Tan JS, et al. Smoking and the Long-term Incidence of Cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2008;15(3):155-61. PubMed PMID: 18569810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking and the long-term incidence of cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. AU - Tan,Jennifer S L, AU - Wang,Jie Jin, AU - Younan,Christine, AU - Cumming,Robert G, AU - Rochtchina,Elena, AU - Mitchell,Paul, PY - 2008/6/24/pubmed PY - 2008/8/14/medline PY - 2008/6/24/entrez SP - 155 EP - 61 JF - Ophthalmic epidemiology JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiol VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To assess the association between smoking and the long-term incidence of cataract and cataract surgery. METHODS: In a population-based cohort of Australians aged 49 years and over, 3654 participants were seen at baseline (1992-94) and 2406 were seen after 5- and/or 10-years and had photographs taken to assess incident cataract. Smoking status was recorded at interview. History, physical examination and fasting blood samples provided data on possible risk factors. Cataract incidence was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier survival approach. Discrete linear logistic models were used to assess risk of incident cataract. RESULTS: After controlling for age, sex and other factors, ever smokers had an increased risk of developing nuclear cataract compared to never smokers (relative risk (RR) 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.83; RR 1.37, CI 1.04-1.81 for past smoking and RR 1.57, CI 1.06-2.31 for current smoking). The effect of smoking was strongest in ever smokers reporting 36 + pack-years of smoking compared to never smokers (RR 1.46; CI, 1.02-2.08). Current smokers also developed nuclear cataract slightly younger than non-smokers (mean age 65.2 versus 67.5 years, p = 0.049). No statistically significant associations were found between smoking status and the incidence of cortical or posterior subcapsular cataract, or cataract surgery. CONCLUSIONS: These epidemiological data confirm smoking as a modest risk factor for the development of nuclear cataract. SN - 1744-5086 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18569810/Smoking_and_the_long_term_incidence_of_cataract:_the_Blue_Mountains_Eye_Study_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09286580701840362 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -