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Self-medication of anxiety disorders with alcohol and drugs: Results from a nationally representative sample.
J Anxiety Disord. 2009 Jan; 23(1):38-45.JA

Abstract

Self-medication--the use of alcohol or drugs in an attempt to reduce anxiety--has often been invoked as an explanatory mechanism for the high co-occurrence of anxiety and substance use disorders (for reviews, see Allan, C. A. (1995). Alcohol problems and anxiety disorders-A critical review. Alcohol & Alcoholism, 30(2), 145-151; Kushner, M. G., Abrams, K., & Borchardt. (2000). The relationship between anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorders: A review of major perspectives and findings. Clinical Psychology Review, 20(2), 149-171). The current study expands upon previous self-medication research by: (1) examining prevalence and comorbidity of self-medication for anxiety disorders (panic disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder); (2) using a nationally representative sample (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions; N=43,093) to do so; and (3) by differentiating self-medication with alcohol from self-medication with drugs. Prevalence rates ranged from 18.3% (self-medication with alcohol for generalized anxiety disorder) to 3.3% (self-medication with both alcohol and drugs for specific phobia and panic disorder without agoraphobia). Multiple logistic regression analyses determined that self-medication with alcohol was associated with increased likelihood of any mood or personality disorder diagnosis, while self-medication with both alcohol and drugs further increased these associations over and above self-medication with alcohol alone. Findings remained significant after adjusting for sociodemographic and substance use disorder variables, which suggests that independently of substance use disorders, self-medication can be viewed as a marker of severity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. jenrobinson1@gmail.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18571370

Citation

Robinson, Jennifer, et al. "Self-medication of Anxiety Disorders With Alcohol and Drugs: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample." Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 23, no. 1, 2009, pp. 38-45.
Robinson J, Sareen J, Cox BJ, et al. Self-medication of anxiety disorders with alcohol and drugs: Results from a nationally representative sample. J Anxiety Disord. 2009;23(1):38-45.
Robinson, J., Sareen, J., Cox, B. J., & Bolton, J. (2009). Self-medication of anxiety disorders with alcohol and drugs: Results from a nationally representative sample. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23(1), 38-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.03.013
Robinson J, et al. Self-medication of Anxiety Disorders With Alcohol and Drugs: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample. J Anxiety Disord. 2009;23(1):38-45. PubMed PMID: 18571370.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-medication of anxiety disorders with alcohol and drugs: Results from a nationally representative sample. AU - Robinson,Jennifer, AU - Sareen,Jitender, AU - Cox,Brian J, AU - Bolton,James, Y1 - 2008/03/22/ PY - 2007/06/16/received PY - 2008/03/14/revised PY - 2008/03/14/accepted PY - 2008/6/24/entrez PY - 2008/6/24/pubmed PY - 2009/4/30/medline SP - 38 EP - 45 JF - Journal of anxiety disorders JO - J Anxiety Disord VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - Self-medication--the use of alcohol or drugs in an attempt to reduce anxiety--has often been invoked as an explanatory mechanism for the high co-occurrence of anxiety and substance use disorders (for reviews, see Allan, C. A. (1995). Alcohol problems and anxiety disorders-A critical review. Alcohol & Alcoholism, 30(2), 145-151; Kushner, M. G., Abrams, K., & Borchardt. (2000). The relationship between anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorders: A review of major perspectives and findings. Clinical Psychology Review, 20(2), 149-171). The current study expands upon previous self-medication research by: (1) examining prevalence and comorbidity of self-medication for anxiety disorders (panic disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder); (2) using a nationally representative sample (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions; N=43,093) to do so; and (3) by differentiating self-medication with alcohol from self-medication with drugs. Prevalence rates ranged from 18.3% (self-medication with alcohol for generalized anxiety disorder) to 3.3% (self-medication with both alcohol and drugs for specific phobia and panic disorder without agoraphobia). Multiple logistic regression analyses determined that self-medication with alcohol was associated with increased likelihood of any mood or personality disorder diagnosis, while self-medication with both alcohol and drugs further increased these associations over and above self-medication with alcohol alone. Findings remained significant after adjusting for sociodemographic and substance use disorder variables, which suggests that independently of substance use disorders, self-medication can be viewed as a marker of severity. SN - 0887-6185 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18571370/Self_medication_of_anxiety_disorders_with_alcohol_and_drugs:_Results_from_a_nationally_representative_sample_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-6185(08)00085-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -