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Lipid abnormalities in black renal patients.
N Y State J Med. 1991 May; 91(5):192-6.NY

Abstract

Racial differences in lipoprotein (LP) and cardiovascular (CV) abnormalities have been noted in the general population and in the population of patients on dialysis. Few studies have investigated the interaction of race and LP and CV disturbances in other renal disease groups. We studied lipid profiles and risk ratios (total cholesterol (TC)/high density lipoprotein-cholesterol) (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I/apo B (A-I/B)) and the influence of race across a spectrum of renal disease groups (normal renal function (NRD), nephrotic range proteinuria (NS), hemodialysis (HD), continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), post-transplant (TR), renal insufficiency (RI)). We also performed a longitudinal study of lipid profiles in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and the relationship of these profiles to race and other variables. There was a general tendency towards a better CV risk profile for blacks than whites in all the groups. Blacks tended to have lower TC, higher HDL-C, lower TC/HDL-C, higher apo A-I, lower apo B, and higher A-I/B. We analyzed four yearly cross-sections of the HD and CAPD populations using ANOVA with adjustment for appropriate covariates. Whites had lower HDL-C and a higher TC/HDL-C risk ratio than blacks. HD patients had lower TC, TC/HDL-C, apo A-I, and apo B than CAPD patients, and women had higher TC than men. When lipid profiles were studied longitudinally by yearly intervals, no consistent significant changes were seen, but over two years, levels of apo B fell and A-I/B rose. Race had no significant effect on any of the longitudinal data.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Long Island College Hospital, Avram Center for Kidney Disease, Brooklyn, NY 11201.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1857570

Citation

Burrell, D E., et al. "Lipid Abnormalities in Black Renal Patients." New York State Journal of Medicine, vol. 91, no. 5, 1991, pp. 192-6.
Burrell DE, Antignani A, Goldwasser P, et al. Lipid abnormalities in black renal patients. N Y State J Med. 1991;91(5):192-6.
Burrell, D. E., Antignani, A., Goldwasser, P., Mittman, N., Fein, P. A., Slater, P. A., Gan, A., & Avram, M. M. (1991). Lipid abnormalities in black renal patients. New York State Journal of Medicine, 91(5), 192-6.
Burrell DE, et al. Lipid Abnormalities in Black Renal Patients. N Y State J Med. 1991;91(5):192-6. PubMed PMID: 1857570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipid abnormalities in black renal patients. AU - Burrell,D E, AU - Antignani,A, AU - Goldwasser,P, AU - Mittman,N, AU - Fein,P A, AU - Slater,P A, AU - Gan,A, AU - Avram,M M, PY - 1991/5/1/pubmed PY - 1991/5/1/medline PY - 1991/5/1/entrez SP - 192 EP - 6 JF - New York state journal of medicine JO - N Y State J Med VL - 91 IS - 5 N2 - Racial differences in lipoprotein (LP) and cardiovascular (CV) abnormalities have been noted in the general population and in the population of patients on dialysis. Few studies have investigated the interaction of race and LP and CV disturbances in other renal disease groups. We studied lipid profiles and risk ratios (total cholesterol (TC)/high density lipoprotein-cholesterol) (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I/apo B (A-I/B)) and the influence of race across a spectrum of renal disease groups (normal renal function (NRD), nephrotic range proteinuria (NS), hemodialysis (HD), continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), post-transplant (TR), renal insufficiency (RI)). We also performed a longitudinal study of lipid profiles in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and the relationship of these profiles to race and other variables. There was a general tendency towards a better CV risk profile for blacks than whites in all the groups. Blacks tended to have lower TC, higher HDL-C, lower TC/HDL-C, higher apo A-I, lower apo B, and higher A-I/B. We analyzed four yearly cross-sections of the HD and CAPD populations using ANOVA with adjustment for appropriate covariates. Whites had lower HDL-C and a higher TC/HDL-C risk ratio than blacks. HD patients had lower TC, TC/HDL-C, apo A-I, and apo B than CAPD patients, and women had higher TC than men. When lipid profiles were studied longitudinally by yearly intervals, no consistent significant changes were seen, but over two years, levels of apo B fell and A-I/B rose. Race had no significant effect on any of the longitudinal data.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0028-7628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1857570/Lipid_abnormalities_in_black_renal_patients_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/kidneyfailure.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -