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Impact of occult hepatitis B virus infection and prior hepatitis B virus infection on development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus.
Scand J Gastroenterol 2008; 43(7):849-56SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA can be detected in liver or sera of patients without serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), its clinical relevance in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. This observational cohort study was conducted to clarify the risk factors, including the presence of serum HBV DNA and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc), for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis (LC).

MATERIAL AND METHODS

The study comprised 123 patients with LC due to HCV, and negative for HBsAg. The risk factors for HCC development were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Serum samples were assayed for HBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction.

RESULTS

Serum HBV DNA was detectable in 14 patients (11.4%) and serum anti-HBc in 96 (78.0%). During the follow-up period (mean 53.3 months), 80 patients (65.0%) developed HCC. The cumulative HCC development rate was significantly higher in the anti-HBc-positive group than in the anti-HBc-negative group (p=0.0039), but did not differ between the serum HBV DNA-positive and -negative groups (p=0.8570). The multivariate analysis indicated that male gender, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) 20 ng/ml or greater, average serum alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) 80 IU/l or greater and the presence of anti-HBc were independent risk factors for development of HCC (p=0.038, p=0.013, p=0.020 and p=0.001, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Serum anti-HBc, which indicates a previous HBV infection, has clinical significance in hepatocarcinogenesis in patients with HCV-related LC, but serum HBV DNA does not. Therefore, anti-HBc in serum is a significant predictor for HCC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan. dm04002y@st.kitasato-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18584524

Citation

Adachi, Shigeru, et al. "Impact of Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Prior Hepatitis B Virus Infection On Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis Due to Hepatitis C Virus." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 43, no. 7, 2008, pp. 849-56.
Adachi S, Shibuya A, Miura Y, et al. Impact of occult hepatitis B virus infection and prior hepatitis B virus infection on development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2008;43(7):849-56.
Adachi, S., Shibuya, A., Miura, Y., Takeuchi, A., Nakazawa, T., & Saigenji, K. (2008). Impact of occult hepatitis B virus infection and prior hepatitis B virus infection on development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 43(7), pp. 849-56. doi:10.1080/00365520801935459.
Adachi S, et al. Impact of Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Prior Hepatitis B Virus Infection On Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis Due to Hepatitis C Virus. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2008;43(7):849-56. PubMed PMID: 18584524.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of occult hepatitis B virus infection and prior hepatitis B virus infection on development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus. AU - Adachi,Shigeru, AU - Shibuya,Akitaka, AU - Miura,Yukiko, AU - Takeuchi,Atsuko, AU - Nakazawa,Takahide, AU - Saigenji,Katsunori, PY - 2008/6/28/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/6/28/entrez SP - 849 EP - 56 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 43 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA can be detected in liver or sera of patients without serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), its clinical relevance in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. This observational cohort study was conducted to clarify the risk factors, including the presence of serum HBV DNA and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc), for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis (LC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised 123 patients with LC due to HCV, and negative for HBsAg. The risk factors for HCC development were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Serum samples were assayed for HBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Serum HBV DNA was detectable in 14 patients (11.4%) and serum anti-HBc in 96 (78.0%). During the follow-up period (mean 53.3 months), 80 patients (65.0%) developed HCC. The cumulative HCC development rate was significantly higher in the anti-HBc-positive group than in the anti-HBc-negative group (p=0.0039), but did not differ between the serum HBV DNA-positive and -negative groups (p=0.8570). The multivariate analysis indicated that male gender, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) 20 ng/ml or greater, average serum alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) 80 IU/l or greater and the presence of anti-HBc were independent risk factors for development of HCC (p=0.038, p=0.013, p=0.020 and p=0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Serum anti-HBc, which indicates a previous HBV infection, has clinical significance in hepatocarcinogenesis in patients with HCV-related LC, but serum HBV DNA does not. Therefore, anti-HBc in serum is a significant predictor for HCC. SN - 1502-7708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18584524/Impact_of_occult_hepatitis_B_virus_infection_and_prior_hepatitis_B_virus_infection_on_development_of_hepatocellular_carcinoma_in_patients_with_liver_cirrhosis_due_to_hepatitis_C_virus_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365520801935459 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -