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In vivo glucose monitoring: towards 'Sense and Act' feedback-loop individualized medical systems.
Talanta. 2008 May 15; 75(3):636-41.T

Abstract

Glucose biosensors are key components of closed-loop glycaemic control (insulin delivery) systems for effective management of diabetes. By providing a fast return of the analytical information in a timely fashion, such sensors offer direct and reliable assessment of rapid changes in the glucose level, as desired for making optimal and timely therapeutic interventions in cases of hypo- and hyperglycemia. The majority of sensors used for continuous glucose monitoring are amperometric enzyme electrodes. The successful realization of closed-loop glycaemic control requires innovative approaches for addressing major challenges of biofouling, inflammatory response, calibration, stability, selectivity, power, miniaturization, common to other remote sensor systems. The goal of this review article is to demonstrate how these challenges are being addressed towards achieving reliable continuous subcutaneous monitoring of glucose. While the concept is presented here in connection to the management of diabetes, such loop-based individualized integrated (sensing/release) medical systems should lead to a fine-tune drug therapy and should have an enormous impact upon the treatment and management of different diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biodesign Institute, Department of Chemical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5001, USA. joseph.wang@asu.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18585125

Citation

Wang, Joseph. "In Vivo Glucose Monitoring: Towards 'Sense and Act' Feedback-loop Individualized Medical Systems." Talanta, vol. 75, no. 3, 2008, pp. 636-41.
Wang J. In vivo glucose monitoring: towards 'Sense and Act' feedback-loop individualized medical systems. Talanta. 2008;75(3):636-41.
Wang, J. (2008). In vivo glucose monitoring: towards 'Sense and Act' feedback-loop individualized medical systems. Talanta, 75(3), 636-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2007.10.023
Wang J. In Vivo Glucose Monitoring: Towards 'Sense and Act' Feedback-loop Individualized Medical Systems. Talanta. 2008 May 15;75(3):636-41. PubMed PMID: 18585125.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vivo glucose monitoring: towards 'Sense and Act' feedback-loop individualized medical systems. A1 - Wang,Joseph, Y1 - 2007/10/22/ PY - 2007/02/13/received PY - 2007/10/11/accepted PY - 2008/7/1/pubmed PY - 2008/9/25/medline PY - 2008/7/1/entrez SP - 636 EP - 41 JF - Talanta JO - Talanta VL - 75 IS - 3 N2 - Glucose biosensors are key components of closed-loop glycaemic control (insulin delivery) systems for effective management of diabetes. By providing a fast return of the analytical information in a timely fashion, such sensors offer direct and reliable assessment of rapid changes in the glucose level, as desired for making optimal and timely therapeutic interventions in cases of hypo- and hyperglycemia. The majority of sensors used for continuous glucose monitoring are amperometric enzyme electrodes. The successful realization of closed-loop glycaemic control requires innovative approaches for addressing major challenges of biofouling, inflammatory response, calibration, stability, selectivity, power, miniaturization, common to other remote sensor systems. The goal of this review article is to demonstrate how these challenges are being addressed towards achieving reliable continuous subcutaneous monitoring of glucose. While the concept is presented here in connection to the management of diabetes, such loop-based individualized integrated (sensing/release) medical systems should lead to a fine-tune drug therapy and should have an enormous impact upon the treatment and management of different diseases. SN - 1873-3573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18585125/In_vivo_glucose_monitoring:_towards_'Sense_and_Act'_feedback_loop_individualized_medical_systems_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0039-9140(07)00707-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -