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Cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
Circulation. 2008 Jul 15; 118(3):277-83.Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common cause of liver disease in children, is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. However, the relationship between NAFLD and cardiovascular risk factors in children is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine the association between NAFLD and the presence of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese children.

METHODS AND RESULTS

This case-control study of 150 overweight children with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 150 overweight children without NAFLD compared rates of metabolic syndrome using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Cases and controls were well matched in age, sex, and severity of obesity. Children with NAFLD had significantly higher fasting glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure than overweight and obese children without NAFLD. Subjects with NAFLD also had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than controls. After adjustment for age, sex, race, ethnicity, body mass index, and hyperinsulinemia, children with metabolic syndrome had 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 2.6 to 9.7) times the odds of having NAFLD as overweight and obese children without metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS

NAFLD in overweight and obese children is strongly associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. The identification of NAFLD in a child should prompt global counseling to address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, 200 W Arbor Dr, San Diego, CA 92103-8450, USA. jschwimmer@ucsd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18591439

Citation

Schwimmer, Jeffrey B., et al. "Cardiovascular Risk Factors and the Metabolic Syndrome in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease." Circulation, vol. 118, no. 3, 2008, pp. 277-83.
Schwimmer JB, Pardee PE, Lavine JE, et al. Cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Circulation. 2008;118(3):277-83.
Schwimmer, J. B., Pardee, P. E., Lavine, J. E., Blumkin, A. K., & Cook, S. (2008). Cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Circulation, 118(3), 277-83. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.739920
Schwimmer JB, et al. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and the Metabolic Syndrome in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Circulation. 2008 Jul 15;118(3):277-83. PubMed PMID: 18591439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. AU - Schwimmer,Jeffrey B, AU - Pardee,Perrie E, AU - Lavine,Joel E, AU - Blumkin,Aaron K, AU - Cook,Stephen, Y1 - 2008/06/30/ PY - 2008/7/2/pubmed PY - 2008/8/14/medline PY - 2008/7/2/entrez SP - 277 EP - 83 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 118 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common cause of liver disease in children, is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. However, the relationship between NAFLD and cardiovascular risk factors in children is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine the association between NAFLD and the presence of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese children. METHODS AND RESULTS: This case-control study of 150 overweight children with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 150 overweight children without NAFLD compared rates of metabolic syndrome using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Cases and controls were well matched in age, sex, and severity of obesity. Children with NAFLD had significantly higher fasting glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure than overweight and obese children without NAFLD. Subjects with NAFLD also had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than controls. After adjustment for age, sex, race, ethnicity, body mass index, and hyperinsulinemia, children with metabolic syndrome had 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 2.6 to 9.7) times the odds of having NAFLD as overweight and obese children without metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: NAFLD in overweight and obese children is strongly associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. The identification of NAFLD in a child should prompt global counseling to address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18591439/Cardiovascular_risk_factors_and_the_metabolic_syndrome_in_pediatric_nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.739920?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -