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Successful training of HEMS personnel in laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway placement.
Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug; 27(4):185-7.AM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

To evaluate laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) placement by helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) personnel after a comprehensive training program.

METHODS

HEMS flight staff attended a didactic and manikin-based training session for both devices. After this training, they attempted LMA and ILMA placement in live, anesthetized patients in an operating room (OR). Outcome measures included placement success rates with the LMA, ILMA, and endotracheal intubation through the ILMA, time to ventilation, and time to intubation. Success rates and time to ventilation were compared using chi-squared and analysis of variance (ANOVA), respectively. Mean time to ventilation for the first and second placements of both devices was examined with repeated measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

There was no difference in successful placement of the LMA compared with the ILMA (100% vs. 91%, P = .15). Ninety-five percent (19/20) of patients were successfully intubated through the ILMA. Time to intubation was 57.1 +/- 55 seconds (range, 20-240). Mean time to ventilation with either device did not differ significantly (36.8 +/- 17 vs. 38.05 +/- 20 seconds; P = .29). Mean time to ventilation for the first and second placement of either the LMA (P = .45) or the ILMA (P = .47) was not statistically different.

CONCLUSION

Trained HEMS flight staff are capable of effectively placing the LMA and ILMA in the operating room after a comprehensive training protocol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

LifeLink III, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Ralph.j.frascone@HealthPartners.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18603215

Citation

Frascone, R J., et al. "Successful Training of HEMS Personnel in Laryngeal Mask Airway and Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway Placement." Air Medical Journal, vol. 27, no. 4, 2008, pp. 185-7.
Frascone RJ, Pippert G, Heegaard W, et al. Successful training of HEMS personnel in laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway placement. Air Med J. 2008;27(4):185-7.
Frascone, R. J., Pippert, G., Heegaard, W., Molinari, P., & Dries, D. (2008). Successful training of HEMS personnel in laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway placement. Air Medical Journal, 27(4), 185-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amj.2007.11.002
Frascone RJ, et al. Successful Training of HEMS Personnel in Laryngeal Mask Airway and Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway Placement. Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug;27(4):185-7. PubMed PMID: 18603215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Successful training of HEMS personnel in laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway placement. AU - Frascone,R J, AU - Pippert,Greg, AU - Heegaard,William, AU - Molinari,Paul, AU - Dries,David, PY - 2007/07/27/received PY - 2007/10/05/revised PY - 2007/11/13/accepted PY - 2008/7/8/pubmed PY - 2008/9/10/medline PY - 2008/7/8/entrez SP - 185 EP - 7 JF - Air medical journal JO - Air Med J VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: To evaluate laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) placement by helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) personnel after a comprehensive training program. METHODS: HEMS flight staff attended a didactic and manikin-based training session for both devices. After this training, they attempted LMA and ILMA placement in live, anesthetized patients in an operating room (OR). Outcome measures included placement success rates with the LMA, ILMA, and endotracheal intubation through the ILMA, time to ventilation, and time to intubation. Success rates and time to ventilation were compared using chi-squared and analysis of variance (ANOVA), respectively. Mean time to ventilation for the first and second placements of both devices was examined with repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: There was no difference in successful placement of the LMA compared with the ILMA (100% vs. 91%, P = .15). Ninety-five percent (19/20) of patients were successfully intubated through the ILMA. Time to intubation was 57.1 +/- 55 seconds (range, 20-240). Mean time to ventilation with either device did not differ significantly (36.8 +/- 17 vs. 38.05 +/- 20 seconds; P = .29). Mean time to ventilation for the first and second placement of either the LMA (P = .45) or the ILMA (P = .47) was not statistically different. CONCLUSION: Trained HEMS flight staff are capable of effectively placing the LMA and ILMA in the operating room after a comprehensive training protocol. SN - 1067-991X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18603215/Successful_training_of_HEMS_personnel_in_laryngeal_mask_airway_and_intubating_laryngeal_mask_airway_placement_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1067-991X(08)00002-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -