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Subjective and objective measures of physical activity in relationship to bone mineral content during late childhood: the Iowa Bone Development Study.
Br J Sports Med. 2008 Aug; 42(8):658-63.BJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study compared accelerometry to self-report for the assessment of physical activity (PA) in relation to bone mineral content (BMC). In addition, we compared the ability of these measures to assess PA in boys versus girls.

METHODS

Participants in this cross-sectional study included 449 children (mean age 11 years) from the Iowa Bone Development Study. PA was measured via 3-5 days of accelerometry using the Actigraph and 7 day self-report questionnaire using the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children (PAQ-C). Hip, spine, and whole body BMC were measured via dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA).

RESULTS

Partial correlation analysis (controlling for height, weight, and maturity) showed the Actigraph was significantly associated with hip (r = 0.40), spine (r = 0.20), and whole body (r = 0.33) BMC in boys, as was the PAQ-C (r = 0.28 hip, r = 0.19 spine, and r = 0.22 whole body). Among girls, only the Actigraph was significantly associated with hip (r = 0.18) and whole body (r = 0.16) BMC. Both the Actigraph and PAQ-C were significant in hip, spine, and whole body multivariable linear regression models (after controlling for body size and maturity) in boys. Only the Actigraph entered hip BMC regression model in girls.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study supports previous work showing associations between everyday PA and BMC in older children. These associations are more likely to be detected with an objective versus subjective measure of PA, particularly in girls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Sport Studies, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. kathleen-janz@uiowa.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18603581

Citation

Janz, K F., et al. "Subjective and Objective Measures of Physical Activity in Relationship to Bone Mineral Content During Late Childhood: the Iowa Bone Development Study." British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 42, no. 8, 2008, pp. 658-63.
Janz KF, Medema-Johnson HC, Letuchy EM, et al. Subjective and objective measures of physical activity in relationship to bone mineral content during late childhood: the Iowa Bone Development Study. Br J Sports Med. 2008;42(8):658-63.
Janz, K. F., Medema-Johnson, H. C., Letuchy, E. M., Burns, T. L., Gilmore, J. M., Torner, J. C., Willing, M., & Levy, S. M. (2008). Subjective and objective measures of physical activity in relationship to bone mineral content during late childhood: the Iowa Bone Development Study. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(8), 658-63. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2008.047779
Janz KF, et al. Subjective and Objective Measures of Physical Activity in Relationship to Bone Mineral Content During Late Childhood: the Iowa Bone Development Study. Br J Sports Med. 2008;42(8):658-63. PubMed PMID: 18603581.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Subjective and objective measures of physical activity in relationship to bone mineral content during late childhood: the Iowa Bone Development Study. AU - Janz,K F, AU - Medema-Johnson,H C, AU - Letuchy,E M, AU - Burns,T L, AU - Gilmore,J M Eichenberger, AU - Torner,J C, AU - Willing,M, AU - Levy,S M, Y1 - 2008/07/04/ PY - 2008/7/8/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/7/8/entrez SP - 658 EP - 63 JF - British journal of sports medicine JO - Br J Sports Med VL - 42 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study compared accelerometry to self-report for the assessment of physical activity (PA) in relation to bone mineral content (BMC). In addition, we compared the ability of these measures to assess PA in boys versus girls. METHODS: Participants in this cross-sectional study included 449 children (mean age 11 years) from the Iowa Bone Development Study. PA was measured via 3-5 days of accelerometry using the Actigraph and 7 day self-report questionnaire using the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children (PAQ-C). Hip, spine, and whole body BMC were measured via dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA). RESULTS: Partial correlation analysis (controlling for height, weight, and maturity) showed the Actigraph was significantly associated with hip (r = 0.40), spine (r = 0.20), and whole body (r = 0.33) BMC in boys, as was the PAQ-C (r = 0.28 hip, r = 0.19 spine, and r = 0.22 whole body). Among girls, only the Actigraph was significantly associated with hip (r = 0.18) and whole body (r = 0.16) BMC. Both the Actigraph and PAQ-C were significant in hip, spine, and whole body multivariable linear regression models (after controlling for body size and maturity) in boys. Only the Actigraph entered hip BMC regression model in girls. CONCLUSIONS: Our study supports previous work showing associations between everyday PA and BMC in older children. These associations are more likely to be detected with an objective versus subjective measure of PA, particularly in girls. SN - 1473-0480 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18603581/Subjective_and_objective_measures_of_physical_activity_in_relationship_to_bone_mineral_content_during_late_childhood:_the_Iowa_Bone_Development_Study_ L2 - http://bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18603581 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -