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Growth and activity of Bulgarian yogurt starter culture in iron-fortified milk.
J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2008 Oct; 35(10):1109-15.JI

Abstract

Bulgarian yogurts were manufactured and fortified with 8, 15 and 27 mg of iron kg(-1) of yogurt. The growth and acidifying activity of the starter culture bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus 13a and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11 were monitored during milk fermentation and over 15 days of yogurt storage at 4 degrees C. Fortifying milk with iron did not affect significantly the growth of the starter culture during manufacture and storage of yogurt. Counts of yogurt bacteria at the end of fermentation of iron-fortified milks were between 2.1 x 10(10) and 4.6 x 10(10) CFU ml(-1), which were not significantly different from numbers in unfortified yogurts. In all batches of yogurt, the viable cell counts of S. thermophilus 13a were approximately three times higher than those of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Greater decrease in viable cell count over 15 days of storage was observed for S. thermophilus 13a compared to L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Intensive accumulation of lactic acid was observed during incubation of milk and all batches reached pH 4.5 +/- 0.1 after 3.0 h. At the end of fermentation process, lactic acid concentrations in iron-fortified yogurts were between 6.9 +/- 0.4 and 7.3 +/- 0.5 g l(-1). The acidifying activity of starter culture bacteria in the control and iron-fortified milks was similar. There was no increase in oxidized, metallic and bitter off-flavors in iron-fortified yogurts compared to the control. Iron-fortified yogurts did not differ significantly in their sensorial, chemical and microbiological characteristics with unfortified yogurt, suggesting that yogurt is a suitable vehicle for iron fortification and that the ferrous lactate is an appropriate iron source for yogurt fortification.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 26 Maritza Blvd., Plovdiv, Bulgaria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18604576

Citation

Simova, Emilina, et al. "Growth and Activity of Bulgarian Yogurt Starter Culture in Iron-fortified Milk." Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology, vol. 35, no. 10, 2008, pp. 1109-15.
Simova E, Ivanov G, Simov Z. Growth and activity of Bulgarian yogurt starter culture in iron-fortified milk. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2008;35(10):1109-15.
Simova, E., Ivanov, G., & Simov, Z. (2008). Growth and activity of Bulgarian yogurt starter culture in iron-fortified milk. Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology, 35(10), 1109-15. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10295-008-0389-7
Simova E, Ivanov G, Simov Z. Growth and Activity of Bulgarian Yogurt Starter Culture in Iron-fortified Milk. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2008;35(10):1109-15. PubMed PMID: 18604576.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Growth and activity of Bulgarian yogurt starter culture in iron-fortified milk. AU - Simova,Emilina, AU - Ivanov,Galin, AU - Simov,Zhelyazko, Y1 - 2008/07/05/ PY - 2007/06/04/received PY - 2008/06/13/accepted PY - 2008/7/8/pubmed PY - 2009/1/7/medline PY - 2008/7/8/entrez SP - 1109 EP - 15 JF - Journal of industrial microbiology & biotechnology JO - J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol VL - 35 IS - 10 N2 - Bulgarian yogurts were manufactured and fortified with 8, 15 and 27 mg of iron kg(-1) of yogurt. The growth and acidifying activity of the starter culture bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus 13a and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11 were monitored during milk fermentation and over 15 days of yogurt storage at 4 degrees C. Fortifying milk with iron did not affect significantly the growth of the starter culture during manufacture and storage of yogurt. Counts of yogurt bacteria at the end of fermentation of iron-fortified milks were between 2.1 x 10(10) and 4.6 x 10(10) CFU ml(-1), which were not significantly different from numbers in unfortified yogurts. In all batches of yogurt, the viable cell counts of S. thermophilus 13a were approximately three times higher than those of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Greater decrease in viable cell count over 15 days of storage was observed for S. thermophilus 13a compared to L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Intensive accumulation of lactic acid was observed during incubation of milk and all batches reached pH 4.5 +/- 0.1 after 3.0 h. At the end of fermentation process, lactic acid concentrations in iron-fortified yogurts were between 6.9 +/- 0.4 and 7.3 +/- 0.5 g l(-1). The acidifying activity of starter culture bacteria in the control and iron-fortified milks was similar. There was no increase in oxidized, metallic and bitter off-flavors in iron-fortified yogurts compared to the control. Iron-fortified yogurts did not differ significantly in their sensorial, chemical and microbiological characteristics with unfortified yogurt, suggesting that yogurt is a suitable vehicle for iron fortification and that the ferrous lactate is an appropriate iron source for yogurt fortification. SN - 1367-5435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18604576/Growth_and_activity_of_Bulgarian_yogurt_starter_culture_in_iron_fortified_milk_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jimb/article-lookup/doi/10.1007/s10295-008-0389-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -