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Bridging the acculturation gap: parent-child relationship quality as a moderator in Mexican American families.
Dev Psychol. 2008 Jul; 44(4):1190-4.DP

Abstract

The authors examined the degree to which disparities in parent and child acculturation are linked to both family and child adjustment. With a sample of 1st- and 2nd-generation Mexican American children, acculturation and parent-child relationship quality at 5th grade, and parent-child conflict, child internalizing, and child externalizing at 7th grade were measured. Acculturation gaps with fathers were found to be related to later father-child conflict as well as internalizing and externalizing outcomes. Many of the associations between father-child acculturation gaps and outcomes were moderated by the child's report of the relationship quality between the child and his or her father. Father-child acculturation gaps were associated with negative outcomes only when children reported a poor relationship with their fathers. Mother-child acculturation gaps were not associated with mother-child conflict or adjustment indices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human and Community Development, Family Research Group, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. tomschofield@ucdavis.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18605845

Citation

Schofield, Thomas J., et al. "Bridging the Acculturation Gap: Parent-child Relationship Quality as a Moderator in Mexican American Families." Developmental Psychology, vol. 44, no. 4, 2008, pp. 1190-4.
Schofield TJ, Parke RD, Kim Y, et al. Bridging the acculturation gap: parent-child relationship quality as a moderator in Mexican American families. Dev Psychol. 2008;44(4):1190-4.
Schofield, T. J., Parke, R. D., Kim, Y., & Coltrane, S. (2008). Bridging the acculturation gap: parent-child relationship quality as a moderator in Mexican American families. Developmental Psychology, 44(4), 1190-4. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012529
Schofield TJ, et al. Bridging the Acculturation Gap: Parent-child Relationship Quality as a Moderator in Mexican American Families. Dev Psychol. 2008;44(4):1190-4. PubMed PMID: 18605845.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bridging the acculturation gap: parent-child relationship quality as a moderator in Mexican American families. AU - Schofield,Thomas J, AU - Parke,Ross D, AU - Kim,Young, AU - Coltrane,Scott, PY - 2008/7/9/pubmed PY - 2008/11/19/medline PY - 2008/7/9/entrez SP - 1190 EP - 4 JF - Developmental psychology JO - Dev Psychol VL - 44 IS - 4 N2 - The authors examined the degree to which disparities in parent and child acculturation are linked to both family and child adjustment. With a sample of 1st- and 2nd-generation Mexican American children, acculturation and parent-child relationship quality at 5th grade, and parent-child conflict, child internalizing, and child externalizing at 7th grade were measured. Acculturation gaps with fathers were found to be related to later father-child conflict as well as internalizing and externalizing outcomes. Many of the associations between father-child acculturation gaps and outcomes were moderated by the child's report of the relationship quality between the child and his or her father. Father-child acculturation gaps were associated with negative outcomes only when children reported a poor relationship with their fathers. Mother-child acculturation gaps were not associated with mother-child conflict or adjustment indices. SN - 0012-1649 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18605845/Bridging_the_acculturation_gap:_parent_child_relationship_quality_as_a_moderator_in_Mexican_American_families_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/dev/44/4/1190 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -