Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sexual assault centers: attendance rates, and differences between early and late presenting cases.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008; 87(7):707-15.AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Sexual assault centers (SACs) aim at assisting victims and to provide forensic medical examination (FME). This study explores the gap between assaults actually occurring and those seen at SAC; and the characteristics of cases presented in time/too late for FME (early and late cohorts).

DESIGN

Retrograde descriptive study.

SETTING AND SAMPLE

A two-year series from a self-referral SAC; characteristics of victims, assaults, use of services.

METHODS

Chi-quadrate, uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Number of female victims seen/female at-risk population (attendance rates). Case and service profiles in the two cohorts. Adjusted odds for late presentation.

RESULTS

Attendance rates for females were 0.12% (14-55 years); an estimated 4-7% of sexually assaulted females in the catchment area. Two hundred and seventy eight victims arrived in time for FME, 76 later; 6% males. Assaults in the early cohort were more often performed by strangers. Two hundred and thirty-eight victims underwent FME, 55% complied with follow-up, 55% reported to the police. The late cohort contained more adolescent victims, more acquainted/partner perpetrators, more verbal coercion; 45% medically examined, 80% follow-up compliance; 34% reported to police. Further referrals occurred equally often in both cohorts; 12% to somatic and 39% to psychiatric services. Among victims seen, 5% died within 7 years of consultation.

CONCLUSION

Cases seen at SAC are strongly selected. The late cohort seems more representative of the commonly occurring assaults; young victims, known assailants. Even late presenters are in need of a multidisciplinary approach.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sexual Assault Centre, Oslo Emergency Ward, Oslo, Norway.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18607821

Citation

Nesvold, Helle, et al. "Sexual Assault Centers: Attendance Rates, and Differences Between Early and Late Presenting Cases." Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, vol. 87, no. 7, 2008, pp. 707-15.
Nesvold H, Friis S, Ormstad K. Sexual assault centers: attendance rates, and differences between early and late presenting cases. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(7):707-15.
Nesvold, H., Friis, S., & Ormstad, K. (2008). Sexual assault centers: attendance rates, and differences between early and late presenting cases. Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 87(7), 707-15. https://doi.org/10.1080/00016340802189847
Nesvold H, Friis S, Ormstad K. Sexual Assault Centers: Attendance Rates, and Differences Between Early and Late Presenting Cases. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(7):707-15. PubMed PMID: 18607821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexual assault centers: attendance rates, and differences between early and late presenting cases. AU - Nesvold,Helle, AU - Friis,Svein, AU - Ormstad,Kari, PY - 2008/7/9/pubmed PY - 2008/9/5/medline PY - 2008/7/9/entrez SP - 707 EP - 15 JF - Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica JO - Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand VL - 87 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Sexual assault centers (SACs) aim at assisting victims and to provide forensic medical examination (FME). This study explores the gap between assaults actually occurring and those seen at SAC; and the characteristics of cases presented in time/too late for FME (early and late cohorts). DESIGN: Retrograde descriptive study. SETTING AND SAMPLE: A two-year series from a self-referral SAC; characteristics of victims, assaults, use of services. METHODS: Chi-quadrate, uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of female victims seen/female at-risk population (attendance rates). Case and service profiles in the two cohorts. Adjusted odds for late presentation. RESULTS: Attendance rates for females were 0.12% (14-55 years); an estimated 4-7% of sexually assaulted females in the catchment area. Two hundred and seventy eight victims arrived in time for FME, 76 later; 6% males. Assaults in the early cohort were more often performed by strangers. Two hundred and thirty-eight victims underwent FME, 55% complied with follow-up, 55% reported to the police. The late cohort contained more adolescent victims, more acquainted/partner perpetrators, more verbal coercion; 45% medically examined, 80% follow-up compliance; 34% reported to police. Further referrals occurred equally often in both cohorts; 12% to somatic and 39% to psychiatric services. Among victims seen, 5% died within 7 years of consultation. CONCLUSION: Cases seen at SAC are strongly selected. The late cohort seems more representative of the commonly occurring assaults; young victims, known assailants. Even late presenters are in need of a multidisciplinary approach. SN - 1600-0412 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18607821/Sexual_assault_centers:_attendance_rates_and_differences_between_early_and_late_presenting_cases_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/00016340802189847 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -