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The consequences of providing drinkers with blood alcohol concentration information on assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2008; 69(4):539-49JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined the effect of providing drinkers with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) information on subjective assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk.

METHOD

We sampled 959 drinking participants from a natural drinking environment and asked them to self-administer a personal saliva-based alcohol test. Participants then were asked to rate their alcohol impairment and to indicate whether they could drive legally under one of four BAC feedback conditions (assigned at random): (1) control condition (no BAC feedback provided before the ratings); (2) categorical BAC information (low, high, and highest risk) from the saliva test; (3) categorical BAC information corroborated by a calibrated police breath alcohol analyzer; and (4) precise (three-digit) BAC information from the breath alcohol analyzer.

RESULTS

Both control participants and participants who received precise BAC feedback gave subjective impairment ratings that correlated with actual BACs. For participants who received categorical BAC information from the saliva test, subjective impairment did not correlate with the actual BAC. Providing drinkers with BAC information, however, did help them predict more accurately if their BAC was higher than the legal BAC driving limit.

CONCLUSIONS

Although BAC information can influence drinkers' assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk, there is no strong evidence that personal saliva-based alcohol tests are particularly useful.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, 11720 Beltsville Drive, Suite 900, Calverton, Maryland 20705-3111, USA. mjohnson@pire.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18612570

Citation

Johnson, Mark B., et al. "The Consequences of Providing Drinkers With Blood Alcohol Concentration Information On Assessments of Alcohol Impairment and Drunk-driving Risk." Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 69, no. 4, 2008, pp. 539-49.
Johnson MB, Voas RB, Kelley-Baker T, et al. The consequences of providing drinkers with blood alcohol concentration information on assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2008;69(4):539-49.
Johnson, M. B., Voas, R. B., Kelley-Baker, T., & Furr-Holden, C. D. (2008). The consequences of providing drinkers with blood alcohol concentration information on assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk. Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, 69(4), pp. 539-49.
Johnson MB, et al. The Consequences of Providing Drinkers With Blood Alcohol Concentration Information On Assessments of Alcohol Impairment and Drunk-driving Risk. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2008;69(4):539-49. PubMed PMID: 18612570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The consequences of providing drinkers with blood alcohol concentration information on assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk. AU - Johnson,Mark B, AU - Voas,Robert B, AU - Kelley-Baker,Tara, AU - Furr-Holden,C Debra M, PY - 2008/7/10/pubmed PY - 2008/9/23/medline PY - 2008/7/10/entrez SP - 539 EP - 49 JF - Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs JO - J Stud Alcohol Drugs VL - 69 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of providing drinkers with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) information on subjective assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk. METHOD: We sampled 959 drinking participants from a natural drinking environment and asked them to self-administer a personal saliva-based alcohol test. Participants then were asked to rate their alcohol impairment and to indicate whether they could drive legally under one of four BAC feedback conditions (assigned at random): (1) control condition (no BAC feedback provided before the ratings); (2) categorical BAC information (low, high, and highest risk) from the saliva test; (3) categorical BAC information corroborated by a calibrated police breath alcohol analyzer; and (4) precise (three-digit) BAC information from the breath alcohol analyzer. RESULTS: Both control participants and participants who received precise BAC feedback gave subjective impairment ratings that correlated with actual BACs. For participants who received categorical BAC information from the saliva test, subjective impairment did not correlate with the actual BAC. Providing drinkers with BAC information, however, did help them predict more accurately if their BAC was higher than the legal BAC driving limit. CONCLUSIONS: Although BAC information can influence drinkers' assessments of alcohol impairment and drunk-driving risk, there is no strong evidence that personal saliva-based alcohol tests are particularly useful. SN - 1937-1888 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18612570/The_consequences_of_providing_drinkers_with_blood_alcohol_concentration_information_on_assessments_of_alcohol_impairment_and_drunk_driving_risk_ L2 - https://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsad.2008.69.539 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -