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Cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: application to operation enduring and Iraqi Freedom veterans.
J Clin Psychol. 2008 Aug; 64(8):958-71.JC

Abstract

As the newest generation of veterans returns home from their duties abroad, many face the individual and interpersonal aftereffects of duty-related traumatic experiences. Despite the established association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and relationship problems, there is a lack of evidence-based conjoint treatments that target both PTSD and relationship distress. Cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy (CBCT) for PTSD was developed to address this need. The authors summarize knowledge on the association between PTSD and relationship functioning, as well as recent research on veterans and their partners. Following an overview of CBCT for PTSD, the authors present a case study to illustrate the application of CBCT to an Operation Enduring and Iraqi Freedom couple.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Center for PTSD, Women's Health Sciences Division VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA 02130, USA. Candice.Monson@va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18613094

Citation

Monson, Candice M., et al. "Cognitive-behavioral Conjoint Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Application to Operation Enduring and Iraqi Freedom Veterans." Journal of Clinical Psychology, vol. 64, no. 8, 2008, pp. 958-71.
Monson CM, Fredman SJ, Adair KC. Cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: application to operation enduring and Iraqi Freedom veterans. J Clin Psychol. 2008;64(8):958-71.
Monson, C. M., Fredman, S. J., & Adair, K. C. (2008). Cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: application to operation enduring and Iraqi Freedom veterans. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64(8), 958-71. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.20511
Monson CM, Fredman SJ, Adair KC. Cognitive-behavioral Conjoint Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Application to Operation Enduring and Iraqi Freedom Veterans. J Clin Psychol. 2008;64(8):958-71. PubMed PMID: 18613094.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: application to operation enduring and Iraqi Freedom veterans. AU - Monson,Candice M, AU - Fredman,Steffany J, AU - Adair,Kathryn C, PY - 2008/7/10/pubmed PY - 2008/9/19/medline PY - 2008/7/10/entrez SP - 958 EP - 71 JF - Journal of clinical psychology JO - J Clin Psychol VL - 64 IS - 8 N2 - As the newest generation of veterans returns home from their duties abroad, many face the individual and interpersonal aftereffects of duty-related traumatic experiences. Despite the established association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and relationship problems, there is a lack of evidence-based conjoint treatments that target both PTSD and relationship distress. Cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy (CBCT) for PTSD was developed to address this need. The authors summarize knowledge on the association between PTSD and relationship functioning, as well as recent research on veterans and their partners. Following an overview of CBCT for PTSD, the authors present a case study to illustrate the application of CBCT to an Operation Enduring and Iraqi Freedom couple. SN - 1097-4679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18613094/Cognitive_behavioral_conjoint_therapy_for_posttraumatic_stress_disorder:_application_to_operation_enduring_and_Iraqi_Freedom_veterans_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.20511 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -