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Fish oil intake compared with olive oil intake in late pregnancy and asthma in the offspring: 16 y of registry-based follow-up from a randomized controlled trial.
Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88(1):167-75AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence suggests that asthma is rooted in the intrauterine environment and that intake of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in pregnancy may have immunomodulatory effects on the child.

OBJECTIVE

Our aim was to examine whether increasing maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs in pregnancy may affect offspring risk of asthma.

DESIGN

In 1990, a population-based sample of 533 women with normal pregnancies were randomly assigned 2:1:1 to receive four 1-g gelatin capsules/d with fish oil providing 2.7 g n-3 PUFAs (n = 266); four 1-g, similar-looking capsules/d with olive oil (n = 136); or no oil capsules (n = 131). Women were recruited and randomly assigned around gestation week 30 and asked to take capsules until delivery. Among 531 live-born children, 528 were identified in registries and 523 were still alive by August 2006. Diagnoses from the International Coding of Diseases version 10 were extracted from a mandatory registry that recorded diagnoses reported from hospital contacts.

RESULTS

During the 16 y that passed since childbirth, 19 children from the fish oil and olive oil groups had received an asthma-related diagnosis; 10 had received the diagnosis allergic asthma. The hazard rate of asthma was reduced by 63% (95% CI: 8%, 85%; P = 0.03), whereas the hazard rate of allergic asthma was reduced by 87% (95% CI: 40%, 97%; P = 0.01) in the fish oil compared with the olive oil group.

CONCLUSION

Under the assumption that intake of olive oil in the dose provided here was inert, our results support that increasing n-3 PUFAs in late pregnancy may carry an important prophylactic potential in relation to offspring asthma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Maternal Nutrition Group, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. sfo@ssi.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18614738

Citation

Olsen, Sjurdur F., et al. "Fish Oil Intake Compared With Olive Oil Intake in Late Pregnancy and Asthma in the Offspring: 16 Y of Registry-based Follow-up From a Randomized Controlled Trial." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 88, no. 1, 2008, pp. 167-75.
Olsen SF, Østerdal ML, Salvig JD, et al. Fish oil intake compared with olive oil intake in late pregnancy and asthma in the offspring: 16 y of registry-based follow-up from a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;88(1):167-75.
Olsen, S. F., Østerdal, M. L., Salvig, J. D., Mortensen, L. M., Rytter, D., Secher, N. J., & Henriksen, T. B. (2008). Fish oil intake compared with olive oil intake in late pregnancy and asthma in the offspring: 16 y of registry-based follow-up from a randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 88(1), pp. 167-75.
Olsen SF, et al. Fish Oil Intake Compared With Olive Oil Intake in Late Pregnancy and Asthma in the Offspring: 16 Y of Registry-based Follow-up From a Randomized Controlled Trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;88(1):167-75. PubMed PMID: 18614738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish oil intake compared with olive oil intake in late pregnancy and asthma in the offspring: 16 y of registry-based follow-up from a randomized controlled trial. AU - Olsen,Sjurdur F, AU - Østerdal,Marie Louise, AU - Salvig,Jannie Dalby, AU - Mortensen,Lotte Maxild, AU - Rytter,Dorte, AU - Secher,Niels J, AU - Henriksen,Tine Brink, PY - 2008/7/11/pubmed PY - 2008/8/1/medline PY - 2008/7/11/entrez SP - 167 EP - 75 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 88 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that asthma is rooted in the intrauterine environment and that intake of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in pregnancy may have immunomodulatory effects on the child. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to examine whether increasing maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs in pregnancy may affect offspring risk of asthma. DESIGN: In 1990, a population-based sample of 533 women with normal pregnancies were randomly assigned 2:1:1 to receive four 1-g gelatin capsules/d with fish oil providing 2.7 g n-3 PUFAs (n = 266); four 1-g, similar-looking capsules/d with olive oil (n = 136); or no oil capsules (n = 131). Women were recruited and randomly assigned around gestation week 30 and asked to take capsules until delivery. Among 531 live-born children, 528 were identified in registries and 523 were still alive by August 2006. Diagnoses from the International Coding of Diseases version 10 were extracted from a mandatory registry that recorded diagnoses reported from hospital contacts. RESULTS: During the 16 y that passed since childbirth, 19 children from the fish oil and olive oil groups had received an asthma-related diagnosis; 10 had received the diagnosis allergic asthma. The hazard rate of asthma was reduced by 63% (95% CI: 8%, 85%; P = 0.03), whereas the hazard rate of allergic asthma was reduced by 87% (95% CI: 40%, 97%; P = 0.01) in the fish oil compared with the olive oil group. CONCLUSION: Under the assumption that intake of olive oil in the dose provided here was inert, our results support that increasing n-3 PUFAs in late pregnancy may carry an important prophylactic potential in relation to offspring asthma. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18614738/Fish_oil_intake_compared_with_olive_oil_intake_in_late_pregnancy_and_asthma_in_the_offspring:_16_y_of_registry_based_follow_up_from_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/88.1.167 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -