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Relations between dietary sodium and potassium intakes and mortality from cardiovascular disease: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risks.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jul; 88(1):195-202.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Limited evidence is available about the relations between sodium and potassium intakes and cardiovascular disease in the general population.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to investigate relations between sodium and potassium intakes and cardiovascular disease in Asian populations whose mean sodium intake is generally high.

DESIGN

Between 1988 and 1990, a total of 58,730 Japanese subjects (n = 23,119 men and 35,611 women) aged 40-79 y with no history of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer completed a lifestyle questionnaire including food intake frequency under the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Sports and Science.

RESULTS

After 745,161 person-years of follow-up, we documented 986 deaths from stroke (153 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 227 intraparenchymal hemorrhages, and 510 ischemic strokes) and 424 deaths from coronary heart disease. Sodium intake was positively associated with mortality from total stroke, ischemic stroke, and total cardiovascular disease. The multivariable hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest quintiles of sodium intake after adjustment for age, sex, and cardiovascular disease risk factors was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.21, 2.00; P for trend < 0.001) for total stroke, 2.04 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.94; P for trend < 0.001) for ischemic stroke, and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.69; P for trend < 0.001) for total cardiovascular disease. Potassium intake was inversely associated with mortality from coronary heart disease and total cardiovascular disease. The multivariable hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest quintiles of potassium intake was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.39, 1.06; P for trend = 0.083) for coronary heart disease and 0.73 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.92; P for trend = 0.018) for total cardiovascular disease, and these associations were more evident for women than for men.

CONCLUSIONS

A high sodium intake and a low potassium intake may increase the risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, and the Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18614741

Citation

Umesawa, Mitsumasa, et al. "Relations Between Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes and Mortality From Cardiovascular Disease: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risks." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 88, no. 1, 2008, pp. 195-202.
Umesawa M, Iso H, Date C, et al. Relations between dietary sodium and potassium intakes and mortality from cardiovascular disease: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risks. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;88(1):195-202.
Umesawa, M., Iso, H., Date, C., Yamamoto, A., Toyoshima, H., Watanabe, Y., Kikuchi, S., Koizumi, A., Kondo, T., Inaba, Y., Tanabe, N., & Tamakoshi, A. (2008). Relations between dietary sodium and potassium intakes and mortality from cardiovascular disease: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risks. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 88(1), 195-202.
Umesawa M, et al. Relations Between Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes and Mortality From Cardiovascular Disease: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risks. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;88(1):195-202. PubMed PMID: 18614741.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relations between dietary sodium and potassium intakes and mortality from cardiovascular disease: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risks. AU - Umesawa,Mitsumasa, AU - Iso,Hiroyasu, AU - Date,Chigusa, AU - Yamamoto,Akio, AU - Toyoshima,Hideaki, AU - Watanabe,Yoshiyuki, AU - Kikuchi,Shogo, AU - Koizumi,Akio, AU - Kondo,Takaaki, AU - Inaba,Yutaka, AU - Tanabe,Naohito, AU - Tamakoshi,Akiko, AU - ,, PY - 2008/7/11/pubmed PY - 2008/8/1/medline PY - 2008/7/11/entrez SP - 195 EP - 202 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 88 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Limited evidence is available about the relations between sodium and potassium intakes and cardiovascular disease in the general population. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate relations between sodium and potassium intakes and cardiovascular disease in Asian populations whose mean sodium intake is generally high. DESIGN: Between 1988 and 1990, a total of 58,730 Japanese subjects (n = 23,119 men and 35,611 women) aged 40-79 y with no history of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer completed a lifestyle questionnaire including food intake frequency under the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Sports and Science. RESULTS: After 745,161 person-years of follow-up, we documented 986 deaths from stroke (153 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 227 intraparenchymal hemorrhages, and 510 ischemic strokes) and 424 deaths from coronary heart disease. Sodium intake was positively associated with mortality from total stroke, ischemic stroke, and total cardiovascular disease. The multivariable hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest quintiles of sodium intake after adjustment for age, sex, and cardiovascular disease risk factors was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.21, 2.00; P for trend < 0.001) for total stroke, 2.04 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.94; P for trend < 0.001) for ischemic stroke, and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.69; P for trend < 0.001) for total cardiovascular disease. Potassium intake was inversely associated with mortality from coronary heart disease and total cardiovascular disease. The multivariable hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest quintiles of potassium intake was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.39, 1.06; P for trend = 0.083) for coronary heart disease and 0.73 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.92; P for trend = 0.018) for total cardiovascular disease, and these associations were more evident for women than for men. CONCLUSIONS: A high sodium intake and a low potassium intake may increase the risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18614741/Relations_between_dietary_sodium_and_potassium_intakes_and_mortality_from_cardiovascular_disease:_the_Japan_Collaborative_Cohort_Study_for_Evaluation_of_Cancer_Risks_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/88.1.195 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -