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Randomized trial of a decision aid for individuals considering genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer risk.
Cancer. 2008 Sep 01; 113(5):956-65.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite the potential benefits of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) risk, individuals can find the genetic testing decision-making process complicated and challenging. The goal of the current study was to measure the effectiveness of a tailored decision aid designed specifically to assist individuals to make informed decisions regarding genetic testing for HNPCC risk.

METHODS

In all, 153 individuals were randomized to receive the decision aid or a control pamphlet at the end of their first genetic counseling consultation. Of these, 109 (71.2%) completed the first questionnaire 1 week after consultation, whereas 95 (62.1%) completed the 6-month follow-up questionnaire.

RESULTS

Although the decision aid had no significant effect on postdecisional regret or actual genetic testing decision, the trial results demonstrated that participants who received the decision aid had significantly lower levels of decisional conflict (ie, uncertainty) regarding genetic testing (chi-square(1) = 8.97; P = .003) and were more likely to be classified as having made an informed choice concerning genetic testing (chi-square(1) = 4.37; P = .037) than participants who received a control pamphlet. Also, men who received the decision aid had significantly higher knowledge levels regarding genetic testing compared with men who received the control pamphlet, whereas no such differences were found for women (chi-square(2) = 6.76; P = .034).

CONCLUSIONS

A decision aid for individuals considering genetic testing for HNPCC is an effective intervention to reduce uncertainty and assist individuals to make an informed choice regarding genetic testing for HNPCC after genetic counseling.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia. c.wakefield@unsw.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18618513

Citation

Wakefield, Claire E., et al. "Randomized Trial of a Decision Aid for Individuals Considering Genetic Testing for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Risk." Cancer, vol. 113, no. 5, 2008, pp. 956-65.
Wakefield CE, Meiser B, Homewood J, et al. Randomized trial of a decision aid for individuals considering genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer risk. Cancer. 2008;113(5):956-65.
Wakefield, C. E., Meiser, B., Homewood, J., Ward, R., O'Donnell, S., & Kirk, J. (2008). Randomized trial of a decision aid for individuals considering genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer risk. Cancer, 113(5), 956-65. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23681
Wakefield CE, et al. Randomized Trial of a Decision Aid for Individuals Considering Genetic Testing for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Risk. Cancer. 2008 Sep 1;113(5):956-65. PubMed PMID: 18618513.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Randomized trial of a decision aid for individuals considering genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer risk. AU - Wakefield,Claire E, AU - Meiser,Bettina, AU - Homewood,Judi, AU - Ward,Robyn, AU - O'Donnell,Sheridan, AU - Kirk,Judy, AU - ,, PY - 2008/7/12/pubmed PY - 2008/9/20/medline PY - 2008/7/12/entrez SP - 956 EP - 65 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 113 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite the potential benefits of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) risk, individuals can find the genetic testing decision-making process complicated and challenging. The goal of the current study was to measure the effectiveness of a tailored decision aid designed specifically to assist individuals to make informed decisions regarding genetic testing for HNPCC risk. METHODS: In all, 153 individuals were randomized to receive the decision aid or a control pamphlet at the end of their first genetic counseling consultation. Of these, 109 (71.2%) completed the first questionnaire 1 week after consultation, whereas 95 (62.1%) completed the 6-month follow-up questionnaire. RESULTS: Although the decision aid had no significant effect on postdecisional regret or actual genetic testing decision, the trial results demonstrated that participants who received the decision aid had significantly lower levels of decisional conflict (ie, uncertainty) regarding genetic testing (chi-square(1) = 8.97; P = .003) and were more likely to be classified as having made an informed choice concerning genetic testing (chi-square(1) = 4.37; P = .037) than participants who received a control pamphlet. Also, men who received the decision aid had significantly higher knowledge levels regarding genetic testing compared with men who received the control pamphlet, whereas no such differences were found for women (chi-square(2) = 6.76; P = .034). CONCLUSIONS: A decision aid for individuals considering genetic testing for HNPCC is an effective intervention to reduce uncertainty and assist individuals to make an informed choice regarding genetic testing for HNPCC after genetic counseling. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18618513/Randomized_trial_of_a_decision_aid_for_individuals_considering_genetic_testing_for_hereditary_nonpolyposis_colorectal_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23681 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -