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Human cytomegalovirus infection in infants with prolonged neonatal jaundice.
J Clin Virol. 2008 Oct; 43(2):216-8.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in infants has been associated with liver disease, the role of HCMV in infants presenting with prolonged neonatal jaundice is unclear as this clinical picture can be caused by a broad spectrum of underlying conditions.

OBJECTIVES

This study aimed to determine a possible role for HCMV infection in infants with prolonged cholestatic neonatal jaundice that could facilitate the appropriate use of diagnostic assays and specific treatment in this condition.

STUDY DESIGN

HCMV immunohistochemical staining was performed on liver biopsy specimens received for histopathological examination from 85 infants (mean age 3 months) with a clinical history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. HCMV serology was also performed.

RESULTS

One infant with a histological diagnosis of HCMV hepatitis was also positive by immunohistochemical staining, while all other tissue specimens were negative for HCMV. HCMV IgG was positive in 92.3% and HCMV IgM in 39.7% of the infants (n=78).

CONCLUSIONS

The serological results confirm the ubiquitous nature of HCMV with many primary infections occurring within the first year of life. Despite this, HCMV hepatitis was uncommon in this cohort.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Microbiology and Virology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, PO Box 339 (G23), Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa. gnvrdg.md@ufs.ac.zaNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18619898

Citation

Goedhals, D, et al. "Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Infants With Prolonged Neonatal Jaundice." Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, vol. 43, no. 2, 2008, pp. 216-8.
Goedhals D, Kriel J, Hertzog ML, et al. Human cytomegalovirus infection in infants with prolonged neonatal jaundice. J Clin Virol. 2008;43(2):216-8.
Goedhals, D., Kriel, J., Hertzog, M. L., & Janse van Rensburg, M. N. (2008). Human cytomegalovirus infection in infants with prolonged neonatal jaundice. Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, 43(2), 216-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2008.06.001
Goedhals D, et al. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Infants With Prolonged Neonatal Jaundice. J Clin Virol. 2008;43(2):216-8. PubMed PMID: 18619898.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human cytomegalovirus infection in infants with prolonged neonatal jaundice. AU - Goedhals,D, AU - Kriel,J, AU - Hertzog,M L, AU - Janse van Rensburg,M N, Y1 - 2008/07/10/ PY - 2008/01/25/received PY - 2008/04/30/revised PY - 2008/06/03/accepted PY - 2008/7/16/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/7/16/entrez SP - 216 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology JO - J Clin Virol VL - 43 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in infants has been associated with liver disease, the role of HCMV in infants presenting with prolonged neonatal jaundice is unclear as this clinical picture can be caused by a broad spectrum of underlying conditions. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine a possible role for HCMV infection in infants with prolonged cholestatic neonatal jaundice that could facilitate the appropriate use of diagnostic assays and specific treatment in this condition. STUDY DESIGN: HCMV immunohistochemical staining was performed on liver biopsy specimens received for histopathological examination from 85 infants (mean age 3 months) with a clinical history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. HCMV serology was also performed. RESULTS: One infant with a histological diagnosis of HCMV hepatitis was also positive by immunohistochemical staining, while all other tissue specimens were negative for HCMV. HCMV IgG was positive in 92.3% and HCMV IgM in 39.7% of the infants (n=78). CONCLUSIONS: The serological results confirm the ubiquitous nature of HCMV with many primary infections occurring within the first year of life. Despite this, HCMV hepatitis was uncommon in this cohort. SN - 1386-6532 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18619898/Human_cytomegalovirus_infection_in_infants_with_prolonged_neonatal_jaundice_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1386-6532(08)00190-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -