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Clinical manifestations and management of buried bumper syndrome in patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.
Gastrointest Endosc. 2008 Sep; 68(3):580-4.GE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Buried bumper syndrome has been regarded as an uncommon and late complication after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion. A variety of techniques have been reported to treat this problem, but only a few published cases exist.

OBJECTIVE

Our purpose was to present the clinical manifestations and our management of a series of 19 patients with buried bumper syndrome.

DESIGN

Case series study.

SETTING

Referral medical centers.

PATIENTS

Within 5 years, 31 episodes of buried bumper syndrome occurred in 10 men and 9 women. The estimated prevalence was 8.8% (19 in 216 PEG procedures during this period).

INTERVENTION

All the buried tubes were removed smoothly by external traction and replaced with a new pull-type feeding tube by the pull method or a button or balloon replacement tube after dilation of the old tract.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS

Success rate, complication rate.

RESULTS

The duration between occurrence of buried bumper syndrome and PEG placement ranged from 1 to 50 months, with a median of 18 months. All the episodes were treated successfully except for one, in which reinsertion failed and a new PEG tube was inserted 1 week later. No significant complications occurred.

LIMITATION

Small sample size.

CONCLUSIONS

Buried bumper syndrome is not that uncommon and can occur soon after insertion of a PEG tube. The buried tube can be safely removed by external traction and in most cases can then be replaced with a pull-type or balloon replacement tube.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18620346

Citation

Lee, Tzong-Hsi, and Jaw-Town Lin. "Clinical Manifestations and Management of Buried Bumper Syndrome in Patients With Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy." Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol. 68, no. 3, 2008, pp. 580-4.
Lee TH, Lin JT. Clinical manifestations and management of buried bumper syndrome in patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Gastrointest Endosc. 2008;68(3):580-4.
Lee, T. H., & Lin, J. T. (2008). Clinical manifestations and management of buried bumper syndrome in patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 68(3), 580-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2008.04.015
Lee TH, Lin JT. Clinical Manifestations and Management of Buried Bumper Syndrome in Patients With Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy. Gastrointest Endosc. 2008;68(3):580-4. PubMed PMID: 18620346.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical manifestations and management of buried bumper syndrome in patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. AU - Lee,Tzong-Hsi, AU - Lin,Jaw-Town, Y1 - 2008/07/11/ PY - 2008/01/03/received PY - 2008/04/14/accepted PY - 2008/7/16/pubmed PY - 2009/1/7/medline PY - 2008/7/16/entrez SP - 580 EP - 4 JF - Gastrointestinal endoscopy JO - Gastrointest Endosc VL - 68 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Buried bumper syndrome has been regarded as an uncommon and late complication after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion. A variety of techniques have been reported to treat this problem, but only a few published cases exist. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to present the clinical manifestations and our management of a series of 19 patients with buried bumper syndrome. DESIGN: Case series study. SETTING: Referral medical centers. PATIENTS: Within 5 years, 31 episodes of buried bumper syndrome occurred in 10 men and 9 women. The estimated prevalence was 8.8% (19 in 216 PEG procedures during this period). INTERVENTION: All the buried tubes were removed smoothly by external traction and replaced with a new pull-type feeding tube by the pull method or a button or balloon replacement tube after dilation of the old tract. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Success rate, complication rate. RESULTS: The duration between occurrence of buried bumper syndrome and PEG placement ranged from 1 to 50 months, with a median of 18 months. All the episodes were treated successfully except for one, in which reinsertion failed and a new PEG tube was inserted 1 week later. No significant complications occurred. LIMITATION: Small sample size. CONCLUSIONS: Buried bumper syndrome is not that uncommon and can occur soon after insertion of a PEG tube. The buried tube can be safely removed by external traction and in most cases can then be replaced with a pull-type or balloon replacement tube. SN - 1097-6779 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18620346/Clinical_manifestations_and_management_of_buried_bumper_syndrome_in_patients_with_percutaneous_endoscopic_gastrostomy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5107(08)01642-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -