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The effect of smoke-free homes on smoking behavior in the U.S.
Am J Prev Med 2008; 35(3):210-6AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence from longitudinal population surveys is needed to establish whether smoke-free homes might influence smoking behavior.

METHODS

The Tobacco Use Supplement of the nationally representative U.S. Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS) interviewed 3292 adult recent smokers in 2002 and again 12 months later. Both surveys measured smoking status, rules on smoking in the home, and the number of cigarettes smoked per day (cpd). For the main study outcome, an early marker of successful cessation (>or=90 days quit) was used. Analysis was completed in 2008.

RESULTS

In the 12 months ending February 2003, the prevalence of smoke-free homes among recent smokers increased from 33% to 39%. A smoke-free home at baseline was associated with >or=90 days cessation at follow-up (10.9% vs 6.2%, AOR=1.44; 95% CI=0.97, 2.21), and those who maintained a smoke-free home were more likely to be >or=90 days quit than those who did not (12.9% vs 5.7%, AOR=1.99; 95% CI=0.93, 4.25). However, adopting a smoke-free home during the year was associated with a nearly fivefold increase in the percentage of >or=90 days quit (AOR=4.81; 95% CI=3.06, 7.59). This increase was seen among all smokers, including moderate-to-heavy smokers (>or=90 days quit: a smoke-free home=13.0% vs no smoke-free home=2.9%, p<0.001). Among continuing smokers with a smoke-free home at baseline, maintenance of te smoke-free home was associated with a decline in consumption (micro=or-2.18; 95 CI=or-1.24; -3.10 cpd). Among continuing smokers with no smoke-free home at baseline, adoption of that status was also associated with a decline in consumption (micro=or-1.72; 95% CI=or-0.58; -2.85 cpd).

CONCLUSIONS

This study provides strong evidence that the adoption of a smoke-free home is associated with successful quitting among smokers in the U.S.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0901, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18620837

Citation

Messer, Karen, et al. "The Effect of Smoke-free Homes On Smoking Behavior in the U.S." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 35, no. 3, 2008, pp. 210-6.
Messer K, Mills AL, White MM, et al. The effect of smoke-free homes on smoking behavior in the U.S. Am J Prev Med. 2008;35(3):210-6.
Messer, K., Mills, A. L., White, M. M., & Pierce, J. P. (2008). The effect of smoke-free homes on smoking behavior in the U.S. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35(3), pp. 210-6. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2008.05.023.
Messer K, et al. The Effect of Smoke-free Homes On Smoking Behavior in the U.S. Am J Prev Med. 2008;35(3):210-6. PubMed PMID: 18620837.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of smoke-free homes on smoking behavior in the U.S. AU - Messer,Karen, AU - Mills,Alice L, AU - White,Martha M, AU - Pierce,John P, Y1 - 2008/07/11/ PY - 2008/04/10/received PY - 2008/05/16/revised PY - 2008/05/19/accepted PY - 2008/7/16/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/7/16/entrez SP - 210 EP - 6 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence from longitudinal population surveys is needed to establish whether smoke-free homes might influence smoking behavior. METHODS: The Tobacco Use Supplement of the nationally representative U.S. Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS) interviewed 3292 adult recent smokers in 2002 and again 12 months later. Both surveys measured smoking status, rules on smoking in the home, and the number of cigarettes smoked per day (cpd). For the main study outcome, an early marker of successful cessation (>or=90 days quit) was used. Analysis was completed in 2008. RESULTS: In the 12 months ending February 2003, the prevalence of smoke-free homes among recent smokers increased from 33% to 39%. A smoke-free home at baseline was associated with >or=90 days cessation at follow-up (10.9% vs 6.2%, AOR=1.44; 95% CI=0.97, 2.21), and those who maintained a smoke-free home were more likely to be >or=90 days quit than those who did not (12.9% vs 5.7%, AOR=1.99; 95% CI=0.93, 4.25). However, adopting a smoke-free home during the year was associated with a nearly fivefold increase in the percentage of >or=90 days quit (AOR=4.81; 95% CI=3.06, 7.59). This increase was seen among all smokers, including moderate-to-heavy smokers (>or=90 days quit: a smoke-free home=13.0% vs no smoke-free home=2.9%, p<0.001). Among continuing smokers with a smoke-free home at baseline, maintenance of te smoke-free home was associated with a decline in consumption (micro=or-2.18; 95 CI=or-1.24; -3.10 cpd). Among continuing smokers with no smoke-free home at baseline, adoption of that status was also associated with a decline in consumption (micro=or-1.72; 95% CI=or-0.58; -2.85 cpd). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides strong evidence that the adoption of a smoke-free home is associated with successful quitting among smokers in the U.S. SN - 0749-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18620837/The_effect_of_smoke_free_homes_on_smoking_behavior_in_the_U_S_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(08)00501-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -