Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Driver and passenger seatbelt use among U.S. high school students.
Am J Prev Med. 2008 Sep; 35(3):224-9.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In 2005, 40% of motor-vehicle occupant deaths in the group aged 16-19 years involved passengers. Although seatbelts can reduce crash mortality by 50% or more, little is known about the differences in driver-versus-passenger seatbelt use among teens.

METHODS

In 2007, data from the 2001 and 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveys were analyzed for 12,731 black, white, and Hispanic high school students aged >or=16 years reporting seatbelt use as both drivers and passengers. Seatbelt use was compared for driver- and passenger-seat positions, and stratified by age, gender, race/ethnicity, school grades, and histories of either drinking and driving or riding with a drinking driver.

RESULTS

Overall, 59% of students always used seatbelts when driving, but only 42% always buckled up as passengers. Across all covariate strata, passenger seatbelt use was significantly less prevalent than driver seatbelt use (p<0.001). A concordance analysis showed that only 38% of students always wore seatbelts both when driving and while riding as a passenger. Multivariate analyses indicated that, regardless of seat position, seatbelt use was lower for young men, blacks, students with poor grades, and students who reported either drinking and driving or riding with a drinking driver.

CONCLUSIONS

U.S. high school students aged >or=16 years are significantly less likely to wear seatbelts as passengers than as drivers. Interventions designed to promote seatbelt use among teens need to address this disparity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee 37208-3599, USA. nbriggs@mmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18620838

Citation

Briggs, Nathaniel C., et al. "Driver and Passenger Seatbelt Use Among U.S. High School Students." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 35, no. 3, 2008, pp. 224-9.
Briggs NC, Lambert EW, Goldzweig IA, et al. Driver and passenger seatbelt use among U.S. high school students. Am J Prev Med. 2008;35(3):224-9.
Briggs, N. C., Lambert, E. W., Goldzweig, I. A., Levine, R. S., & Warren, R. C. (2008). Driver and passenger seatbelt use among U.S. high school students. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35(3), 224-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2008.03.038
Briggs NC, et al. Driver and Passenger Seatbelt Use Among U.S. High School Students. Am J Prev Med. 2008;35(3):224-9. PubMed PMID: 18620838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Driver and passenger seatbelt use among U.S. high school students. AU - Briggs,Nathaniel C, AU - Lambert,E Warren, AU - Goldzweig,Irwin A, AU - Levine,Robert S, AU - Warren,Rueben C, Y1 - 2008/07/11/ PY - 2007/12/07/received PY - 2008/03/03/revised PY - 2008/03/31/accepted PY - 2008/7/16/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/7/16/entrez SP - 224 EP - 9 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: In 2005, 40% of motor-vehicle occupant deaths in the group aged 16-19 years involved passengers. Although seatbelts can reduce crash mortality by 50% or more, little is known about the differences in driver-versus-passenger seatbelt use among teens. METHODS: In 2007, data from the 2001 and 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveys were analyzed for 12,731 black, white, and Hispanic high school students aged >or=16 years reporting seatbelt use as both drivers and passengers. Seatbelt use was compared for driver- and passenger-seat positions, and stratified by age, gender, race/ethnicity, school grades, and histories of either drinking and driving or riding with a drinking driver. RESULTS: Overall, 59% of students always used seatbelts when driving, but only 42% always buckled up as passengers. Across all covariate strata, passenger seatbelt use was significantly less prevalent than driver seatbelt use (p<0.001). A concordance analysis showed that only 38% of students always wore seatbelts both when driving and while riding as a passenger. Multivariate analyses indicated that, regardless of seat position, seatbelt use was lower for young men, blacks, students with poor grades, and students who reported either drinking and driving or riding with a drinking driver. CONCLUSIONS: U.S. high school students aged >or=16 years are significantly less likely to wear seatbelts as passengers than as drivers. Interventions designed to promote seatbelt use among teens need to address this disparity. SN - 0749-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18620838/Driver_and_passenger_seatbelt_use_among_U_S__high_school_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(08)00521-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -