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The persistence of Golgi complexes during cell division in an insect epidermis.
Tissue Cell 1993; 25(5):709-23TC

Abstract

The Golgi complexes of animal cells are said to become vesicular during cell division in order to allow the equal partitioning of organelles between daughter cells (Warren, 1985). However, in the epidermis of fifth stage larval Calpodes ethlius (Lepidoptera, Hesperi idae), cutical deposition is concurrent with cell division in preparation for pupation. We therefore looked at the Golgi complexes of these epidermal cells to see if they maintained their interphase form to allow them to continue to function during cell division. Dividing cells were recognized by changes in the nucleus and nuclear envelope, the form of the cell cortex and cell surface, and by the disposition of microtubules. Epidermal Golgi complexes consist of 3-5 cisternae capped by endoplasmic reticulum with transfer vesicles and rings of GC beads next to the cis face, and secretory vesicles on the trans face. Golgi complexes of dividing cells are structurally indistinguishable from those in interphase, their beads are in the rings characteristic of active GCs, and cuticle continues in uninterrupted lamellae above the apical microvilli. The observations suggest that Golgi complexes in dividing insect cells differ from those of most vertebrates by remaining functional through mitosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Zoology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18621253

Citation

Zeng, W, and L Michael. "The Persistence of Golgi Complexes During Cell Division in an Insect Epidermis." Tissue & Cell, vol. 25, no. 5, 1993, pp. 709-23.
Zeng W, Michael L. The persistence of Golgi complexes during cell division in an insect epidermis. Tissue Cell. 1993;25(5):709-23.
Zeng, W., & Michael, L. (1993). The persistence of Golgi complexes during cell division in an insect epidermis. Tissue & Cell, 25(5), pp. 709-23.
Zeng W, Michael L. The Persistence of Golgi Complexes During Cell Division in an Insect Epidermis. Tissue Cell. 1993;25(5):709-23. PubMed PMID: 18621253.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The persistence of Golgi complexes during cell division in an insect epidermis. AU - Zeng,W, AU - Michael,L, PY - 1993/03/30/revised PY - 1993/10/1/pubmed PY - 1993/10/1/medline PY - 1993/10/1/entrez SP - 709 EP - 23 JF - Tissue & cell JO - Tissue Cell VL - 25 IS - 5 N2 - The Golgi complexes of animal cells are said to become vesicular during cell division in order to allow the equal partitioning of organelles between daughter cells (Warren, 1985). However, in the epidermis of fifth stage larval Calpodes ethlius (Lepidoptera, Hesperi idae), cutical deposition is concurrent with cell division in preparation for pupation. We therefore looked at the Golgi complexes of these epidermal cells to see if they maintained their interphase form to allow them to continue to function during cell division. Dividing cells were recognized by changes in the nucleus and nuclear envelope, the form of the cell cortex and cell surface, and by the disposition of microtubules. Epidermal Golgi complexes consist of 3-5 cisternae capped by endoplasmic reticulum with transfer vesicles and rings of GC beads next to the cis face, and secretory vesicles on the trans face. Golgi complexes of dividing cells are structurally indistinguishable from those in interphase, their beads are in the rings characteristic of active GCs, and cuticle continues in uninterrupted lamellae above the apical microvilli. The observations suggest that Golgi complexes in dividing insect cells differ from those of most vertebrates by remaining functional through mitosis. SN - 0040-8166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18621253/The_persistence_of_Golgi_complexes_during_cell_division_in_an_insect_epidermis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0040-8166(93)90052-M DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -