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Review of methods for the reduction of dietary content and toxicity of acrylamide.
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13; 56(15):6113-40.JA

Abstract

Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from heat-induced reactions between the amino group of the free amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in cereals, potatoes, and other plant-derived foods. This overview surveys and consolidates the following dietary aspects of acrylamide: distribution in food originating from different sources; consumption by diverse populations; reduction of the acrylamide content in the diet; and suppression of adverse effects in vivo. Methods to reduce adverse effects of dietary acrylamide include (a) selecting potato, cereal, and other plant varieties for dietary use that contain low levels of the acrylamide precursors, namely, asparagine and glucose; (b) removing precursors before processing; (c) using the enzyme asparaginase to hydrolyze asparagine to aspartic acid; (d) selecting processing conditions (pH, temperature, time, processing and storage atmosphere) that minimize acrylamide formation; (e) adding food ingredients (acidulants, amino acids, antioxidants, nonreducing carbohydrates, chitosan, garlic compounds, protein hydrolysates, proteins, metal salts) that have been reported to prevent acrylamide formation; (f) removing/trapping acrylamide after it is formed with the aid of chromatography, evaporation, polymerization, or reaction with other food ingredients; and (g) reducing in vivo toxicity. Research needs are suggested that may further facilitate reducing the acrylamide burden of the diet. Researchers are challenged to (a) apply the available methods and to minimize the acrylamide content of the diet without adversely affecting the nutritional quality, safety, and sensory attributes, including color and flavor, while maintaining consumer acceptance; and (b) educate commercial and home food processors and the public about available approaches to mitigating undesirable effects of dietary acrylamide.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Albany, California 94710, USA. mfried@pw.usda.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18624452

Citation

Friedman, Mendel, and Carol E. Levin. "Review of Methods for the Reduction of Dietary Content and Toxicity of Acrylamide." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 56, no. 15, 2008, pp. 6113-40.
Friedman M, Levin CE. Review of methods for the reduction of dietary content and toxicity of acrylamide. J Agric Food Chem. 2008;56(15):6113-40.
Friedman, M., & Levin, C. E. (2008). Review of methods for the reduction of dietary content and toxicity of acrylamide. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 56(15), 6113-40. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf0730486
Friedman M, Levin CE. Review of Methods for the Reduction of Dietary Content and Toxicity of Acrylamide. J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6113-40. PubMed PMID: 18624452.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review of methods for the reduction of dietary content and toxicity of acrylamide. AU - Friedman,Mendel, AU - Levin,Carol E, Y1 - 2008/07/15/ PY - 2008/7/16/pubmed PY - 2008/9/30/medline PY - 2008/7/16/entrez SP - 6113 EP - 40 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 56 IS - 15 N2 - Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from heat-induced reactions between the amino group of the free amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in cereals, potatoes, and other plant-derived foods. This overview surveys and consolidates the following dietary aspects of acrylamide: distribution in food originating from different sources; consumption by diverse populations; reduction of the acrylamide content in the diet; and suppression of adverse effects in vivo. Methods to reduce adverse effects of dietary acrylamide include (a) selecting potato, cereal, and other plant varieties for dietary use that contain low levels of the acrylamide precursors, namely, asparagine and glucose; (b) removing precursors before processing; (c) using the enzyme asparaginase to hydrolyze asparagine to aspartic acid; (d) selecting processing conditions (pH, temperature, time, processing and storage atmosphere) that minimize acrylamide formation; (e) adding food ingredients (acidulants, amino acids, antioxidants, nonreducing carbohydrates, chitosan, garlic compounds, protein hydrolysates, proteins, metal salts) that have been reported to prevent acrylamide formation; (f) removing/trapping acrylamide after it is formed with the aid of chromatography, evaporation, polymerization, or reaction with other food ingredients; and (g) reducing in vivo toxicity. Research needs are suggested that may further facilitate reducing the acrylamide burden of the diet. Researchers are challenged to (a) apply the available methods and to minimize the acrylamide content of the diet without adversely affecting the nutritional quality, safety, and sensory attributes, including color and flavor, while maintaining consumer acceptance; and (b) educate commercial and home food processors and the public about available approaches to mitigating undesirable effects of dietary acrylamide. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18624452/Review_of_methods_for_the_reduction_of_dietary_content_and_toxicity_of_acrylamide_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf0730486 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -