Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Treatment-seeking veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan: comparison with veterans of previous wars.
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2008 Jul; 196(7):513-21.JN

Abstract

Differences in the characteristics and mental health needs of veterans of the Iraq/Afghanistan war when compared with those of veterans who served in the Persian Gulf war and in the Vietnam war may have important implications for Veterans Affairs (VA) program and treatment planning. Subjects were drawn from administrative data bases of veterans who sought treatment from specialized VA programs for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Current Iraq/Afghanistan veterans were compared with 4 samples of outpatient and inpatient Persian Gulf and Vietnam veterans whose admission to treatment was either contemporaneous or noncontemporaneous with their admission. A series of analyses of covariance was used hierachically to control for program site and age. In analyses of contemporaneous veterans uncontrolled for age, Iraq/Afghanistan veterans differed most notably from Vietnam veterans by being younger, more likely to be female, less likely to be either married or separated/divorced, more often working, less likely to have ever been incarcerated, and less likely to report exposure to atrocities in the military. Regarding clinical status, Iraq/Afghanistan veterans were less often diagnosed with substance abuse disorders, manifested more violent behavior, and had lower rates of VA disability compensation because of PTSD. Differences are more muted in comparisons with Persian Gulf veterans, particularly in those involving noncontemporaneous samples, or those that controlled for age differences. Among recent war veterans with PTSD, social functioning has largely been left intact. There is a window of opportunity, therefore, for developing and focusing on treatment interventions that emphasize the preservation of these social assets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

New England Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, West Haven, Connecticut, USA. alan.fontana@va.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18626291

Citation

Fontana, Alan, and Robert Rosenheck. "Treatment-seeking Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan: Comparison With Veterans of Previous Wars." The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. 196, no. 7, 2008, pp. 513-21.
Fontana A, Rosenheck R. Treatment-seeking veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan: comparison with veterans of previous wars. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2008;196(7):513-21.
Fontana, A., & Rosenheck, R. (2008). Treatment-seeking veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan: comparison with veterans of previous wars. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 196(7), 513-21. https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e31817cf6e6
Fontana A, Rosenheck R. Treatment-seeking Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan: Comparison With Veterans of Previous Wars. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2008;196(7):513-21. PubMed PMID: 18626291.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment-seeking veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan: comparison with veterans of previous wars. AU - Fontana,Alan, AU - Rosenheck,Robert, PY - 2008/7/16/pubmed PY - 2008/8/5/medline PY - 2008/7/16/entrez SP - 513 EP - 21 JF - The Journal of nervous and mental disease JO - J Nerv Ment Dis VL - 196 IS - 7 N2 - Differences in the characteristics and mental health needs of veterans of the Iraq/Afghanistan war when compared with those of veterans who served in the Persian Gulf war and in the Vietnam war may have important implications for Veterans Affairs (VA) program and treatment planning. Subjects were drawn from administrative data bases of veterans who sought treatment from specialized VA programs for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Current Iraq/Afghanistan veterans were compared with 4 samples of outpatient and inpatient Persian Gulf and Vietnam veterans whose admission to treatment was either contemporaneous or noncontemporaneous with their admission. A series of analyses of covariance was used hierachically to control for program site and age. In analyses of contemporaneous veterans uncontrolled for age, Iraq/Afghanistan veterans differed most notably from Vietnam veterans by being younger, more likely to be female, less likely to be either married or separated/divorced, more often working, less likely to have ever been incarcerated, and less likely to report exposure to atrocities in the military. Regarding clinical status, Iraq/Afghanistan veterans were less often diagnosed with substance abuse disorders, manifested more violent behavior, and had lower rates of VA disability compensation because of PTSD. Differences are more muted in comparisons with Persian Gulf veterans, particularly in those involving noncontemporaneous samples, or those that controlled for age differences. Among recent war veterans with PTSD, social functioning has largely been left intact. There is a window of opportunity, therefore, for developing and focusing on treatment interventions that emphasize the preservation of these social assets. SN - 1539-736X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18626291/Treatment_seeking_veterans_of_Iraq_and_Afghanistan:_comparison_with_veterans_of_previous_wars_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e31817cf6e6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -