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Veterinary student and veterinarian attitudes toward veterinary public health and epidemiology.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Jul 15; 233(2):240-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify predictors of veterinary students and veterinarians having an interest in veterinary public health and epidemiology (PH&E).

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SAMPLE POPULATION

Veterinary students enrolled in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University and veterinarians with membership in a Texas veterinary professional organization.

PROCEDURES

2 questionnaires were designed and administered to investigate hypothesized predictors of PH&E interests among veterinary students and veterinarians. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables from both questionnaires. Prevalence ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and chi(2) tests were used to evaluate bivariate associations between variables and an interest in PH&E. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for the effects of multiple variables on the outcome.

RESULTS

70% (215/305) of students believed that a course in PH&E was necessary, and 46% (140/304) believed that more courses in PH&E would improve the veterinary curriculum. Ninety-nine percent (299/303) of veterinarians believed that a course in PH&E was necessary in the curriculum. Ninety-two percent (272/297) of veterinarians agreed that knowledge related to PH&E was important to perform the functions of their job. History of raising animals and membership in 4-H or Future Farmers of America were significant predictors of veterinary students having an interest in PH&E. Being male and growing up in a rural environment were not significant predictors.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Most veterinary students and veterinarians agreed that knowledge of PH&E is important. Variables identified as associated with an interest in PH&E may be useful for designing mitigation strategies to increase the number of veterinarians entering public health careers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4458, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18627226

Citation

Fosgate, Geoffrey T.. "Veterinary Student and Veterinarian Attitudes Toward Veterinary Public Health and Epidemiology." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 233, no. 2, 2008, pp. 240-7.
Fosgate GT. Veterinary student and veterinarian attitudes toward veterinary public health and epidemiology. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008;233(2):240-7.
Fosgate, G. T. (2008). Veterinary student and veterinarian attitudes toward veterinary public health and epidemiology. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 233(2), 240-7. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.233.2.240
Fosgate GT. Veterinary Student and Veterinarian Attitudes Toward Veterinary Public Health and Epidemiology. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Jul 15;233(2):240-7. PubMed PMID: 18627226.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Veterinary student and veterinarian attitudes toward veterinary public health and epidemiology. A1 - Fosgate,Geoffrey T, PY - 2008/7/17/pubmed PY - 2008/8/15/medline PY - 2008/7/17/entrez SP - 240 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 233 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of veterinary students and veterinarians having an interest in veterinary public health and epidemiology (PH&E). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE POPULATION: Veterinary students enrolled in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University and veterinarians with membership in a Texas veterinary professional organization. PROCEDURES: 2 questionnaires were designed and administered to investigate hypothesized predictors of PH&E interests among veterinary students and veterinarians. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables from both questionnaires. Prevalence ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and chi(2) tests were used to evaluate bivariate associations between variables and an interest in PH&E. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for the effects of multiple variables on the outcome. RESULTS: 70% (215/305) of students believed that a course in PH&E was necessary, and 46% (140/304) believed that more courses in PH&E would improve the veterinary curriculum. Ninety-nine percent (299/303) of veterinarians believed that a course in PH&E was necessary in the curriculum. Ninety-two percent (272/297) of veterinarians agreed that knowledge related to PH&E was important to perform the functions of their job. History of raising animals and membership in 4-H or Future Farmers of America were significant predictors of veterinary students having an interest in PH&E. Being male and growing up in a rural environment were not significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Most veterinary students and veterinarians agreed that knowledge of PH&E is important. Variables identified as associated with an interest in PH&E may be useful for designing mitigation strategies to increase the number of veterinarians entering public health careers. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18627226/Veterinary_student_and_veterinarian_attitudes_toward_veterinary_public_health_and_epidemiology_ L2 - https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/10.2460/javma.233.2.240?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -