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Antifungal effect of mouth rinses on oral Candida counts and salivary flow in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients.
AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2008 Aug; 22(8):613-8.AP

Abstract

Oral candidiasis is a major problem in developing countries where antiretroviral therapy is available to a small percentage of the infected population. HIV patients are prone to xerostomia and predisposed to Candida infection. Preventing oral candidiasis is better than the frequent use of antifungals that may lead to the development of drug resistance. This study investigated the ability of commercial mouth rinses and sodium bicarbonate to reduce salivary Candida and to improve the saliva flow of HIV-positive patients. One hundred fifty HIV patients without oral candidiasis were examined for oral lesions initially and after 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Unstimulated saliva was collected; the volume was measured and cultured for yeasts. Subjects were provided with mouth rinses containing either benzydamine hydrochloride, benzydamine hydrochloride with chlorhexidine gluconate, triclosan with sodium fluoride, 5% sodium bicarbonate, or placebo and asked to rinse twice daily for 12 weeks. The effect of the mouth rinses and placebo on Candida counts and saliva flow was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). A total of 108 patients completed the trial, 35 missed appointments, 4 died, 2 developed oral candidiasis, and 1 herpetic lesion. Triclosan/fluoride decreased the Candida count more than the placebo (p = 0.005) while chlorhexidine/benzydamine hydrochloride (p = 0.001) and triclosan/fluoride mouthrinses (p = 0.002) increased the salivary flow during the initial 4 weeks. The most effective mouth rinse triclosan/fluoride decreased oral Candida counts and increased saliva flow. Studies are needed to determine the efficacy of these mouth rinses for the long-term prevention of clinical oral candidiasis in adult HIV-positive patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Oral Microbiology, Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. mrudula.patel@wits.ac.zaNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18627277

Citation

Patel, Mrudula, et al. "Antifungal Effect of Mouth Rinses On Oral Candida Counts and Salivary Flow in Treatment-naïve HIV-infected Patients." AIDS Patient Care and STDs, vol. 22, no. 8, 2008, pp. 613-8.
Patel M, Shackleton JA, Coogan MM, et al. Antifungal effect of mouth rinses on oral Candida counts and salivary flow in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2008;22(8):613-8.
Patel, M., Shackleton, J. A., Coogan, M. M., & Galpin, J. (2008). Antifungal effect of mouth rinses on oral Candida counts and salivary flow in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 22(8), 613-8. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2007.0160
Patel M, et al. Antifungal Effect of Mouth Rinses On Oral Candida Counts and Salivary Flow in Treatment-naïve HIV-infected Patients. AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2008;22(8):613-8. PubMed PMID: 18627277.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antifungal effect of mouth rinses on oral Candida counts and salivary flow in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. AU - Patel,Mrudula, AU - Shackleton,Jo-Anne, AU - Coogan,Maeve M, AU - Galpin,Jacky, PY - 2008/7/17/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/7/17/entrez SP - 613 EP - 8 JF - AIDS patient care and STDs JO - AIDS Patient Care STDS VL - 22 IS - 8 N2 - Oral candidiasis is a major problem in developing countries where antiretroviral therapy is available to a small percentage of the infected population. HIV patients are prone to xerostomia and predisposed to Candida infection. Preventing oral candidiasis is better than the frequent use of antifungals that may lead to the development of drug resistance. This study investigated the ability of commercial mouth rinses and sodium bicarbonate to reduce salivary Candida and to improve the saliva flow of HIV-positive patients. One hundred fifty HIV patients without oral candidiasis were examined for oral lesions initially and after 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Unstimulated saliva was collected; the volume was measured and cultured for yeasts. Subjects were provided with mouth rinses containing either benzydamine hydrochloride, benzydamine hydrochloride with chlorhexidine gluconate, triclosan with sodium fluoride, 5% sodium bicarbonate, or placebo and asked to rinse twice daily for 12 weeks. The effect of the mouth rinses and placebo on Candida counts and saliva flow was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). A total of 108 patients completed the trial, 35 missed appointments, 4 died, 2 developed oral candidiasis, and 1 herpetic lesion. Triclosan/fluoride decreased the Candida count more than the placebo (p = 0.005) while chlorhexidine/benzydamine hydrochloride (p = 0.001) and triclosan/fluoride mouthrinses (p = 0.002) increased the salivary flow during the initial 4 weeks. The most effective mouth rinse triclosan/fluoride decreased oral Candida counts and increased saliva flow. Studies are needed to determine the efficacy of these mouth rinses for the long-term prevention of clinical oral candidiasis in adult HIV-positive patients. SN - 1557-7449 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18627277/Antifungal_effect_of_mouth_rinses_on_oral_Candida_counts_and_salivary_flow_in_treatment_naïve_HIV_infected_patients_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/apc.2007.0160?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -