Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Brain, mind, and body: interactions with art in renaissance Italy.
J Hist Neurosci. 2008; 17(3):295-313.JH

Abstract

The Renaissance saw the first systematic anatomical and physiological studies of the brain and human body because scientists, for the first time in centuries, were allowed to dissect human bodies for study. Renaissance artists were frequently found at dissections and their attention to detail can be observed in their products. Scientists themselves were increasingly artistic, and they created astonishing anatomical models and illustrations that can still be studied. The cross-fertilization of art and science in the Renaissance resulted in more scientific analyses of neuroanatomy as well as more creative ways in which such analyses could be depicted. Both art and science benefited from the reciprocal ways in which the two influenced each other even as they provided new ways of explaining the mysteries of the human body and mind.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Sciences, Rowan Cabarrus Community College, Concord, NC, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18629698

Citation

Ginn, Sheryl R., and Lorenzo Lorusso. "Brain, Mind, and Body: Interactions With Art in Renaissance Italy." Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, vol. 17, no. 3, 2008, pp. 295-313.
Ginn SR, Lorusso L. Brain, mind, and body: interactions with art in renaissance Italy. J Hist Neurosci. 2008;17(3):295-313.
Ginn, S. R., & Lorusso, L. (2008). Brain, mind, and body: interactions with art in renaissance Italy. Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, 17(3), 295-313. https://doi.org/10.1080/09647040701575900
Ginn SR, Lorusso L. Brain, Mind, and Body: Interactions With Art in Renaissance Italy. J Hist Neurosci. 2008;17(3):295-313. PubMed PMID: 18629698.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain, mind, and body: interactions with art in renaissance Italy. AU - Ginn,Sheryl R, AU - Lorusso,Lorenzo, PY - 2008/7/17/pubmed PY - 2008/10/1/medline PY - 2008/7/17/entrez SP - 295 EP - 313 JF - Journal of the history of the neurosciences JO - J Hist Neurosci VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - The Renaissance saw the first systematic anatomical and physiological studies of the brain and human body because scientists, for the first time in centuries, were allowed to dissect human bodies for study. Renaissance artists were frequently found at dissections and their attention to detail can be observed in their products. Scientists themselves were increasingly artistic, and they created astonishing anatomical models and illustrations that can still be studied. The cross-fertilization of art and science in the Renaissance resulted in more scientific analyses of neuroanatomy as well as more creative ways in which such analyses could be depicted. Both art and science benefited from the reciprocal ways in which the two influenced each other even as they provided new ways of explaining the mysteries of the human body and mind. SN - 1744-5213 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18629698/Brain_mind_and_body:_interactions_with_art_in_renaissance_Italy_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09647040701575900 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -