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Effects of residential changes and time patterns on external-cause mortality in migrants: results of a German cohort study.
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jul; 36(5):524-31.SJ

Abstract

AIMS

Immigrants are at increased risk of dying from external causes, particularly suicide. This study presents mortality data from a complete follow-up of a cohort of immigrants from the Former Soviet Union to Germany. Number of residential changes after migration and time period between residential change and death are analysed as predictors for suicide and other causes of mortality.

METHODS

A representative cohort of immigrants (n=34,393) was followed up until 31 December 2002. Residential changes were monitored through city registries. Standardized mortality ratios were calculated for all causes of death and external causes of death (suicides, accidents, other external causes) and deaths attributable to psychoactive substance use. Data on residential change were analysed using Poisson regression to examine differences in external-cause mortality among immigrants who changed residence after immigration. Mortality rates by time since changing residence were calculated, and linear regression analysis was performed to model the effect of cause of death on the time interval between residential change and death.

RESULTS

Male immigrants had a significantly higher risk of dying from external causes and suicide than Germans, and this increases with frequency of residential changes. Suicide mortality was significantly higher shortly after residential change. Linear regression showed that time to death after residential change was 2.5 times shorter for suicide than for any other cause.

CONCLUSIONS

High risk of death from external causes and from deaths attributable to substance abuse in immigrants suggests integration problems. Preventive efforts at targeted integration programmes for immigrants, in particular shortly after residential change, are recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Heidelberg, Institute of Hygiene, Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Heidelberg, Germany. joerdis.ott@urz.uni-heidelberg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18635733

Citation

Ott, Jördis Jennifer, et al. "Effects of Residential Changes and Time Patterns On External-cause Mortality in Migrants: Results of a German Cohort Study." Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, vol. 36, no. 5, 2008, pp. 524-31.
Ott JJ, Winkler V, Kyobutungi C, et al. Effects of residential changes and time patterns on external-cause mortality in migrants: results of a German cohort study. Scand J Public Health. 2008;36(5):524-31.
Ott, J. J., Winkler, V., Kyobutungi, C., Laki, J., & Becher, H. (2008). Effects of residential changes and time patterns on external-cause mortality in migrants: results of a German cohort study. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 36(5), 524-31. https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494807087293
Ott JJ, et al. Effects of Residential Changes and Time Patterns On External-cause Mortality in Migrants: Results of a German Cohort Study. Scand J Public Health. 2008;36(5):524-31. PubMed PMID: 18635733.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of residential changes and time patterns on external-cause mortality in migrants: results of a German cohort study. AU - Ott,Jördis Jennifer, AU - Winkler,Volker, AU - Kyobutungi,Catherine, AU - Laki,Judit, AU - Becher,Heiko, PY - 2008/7/19/pubmed PY - 2008/9/5/medline PY - 2008/7/19/entrez SP - 524 EP - 31 JF - Scandinavian journal of public health JO - Scand J Public Health VL - 36 IS - 5 N2 - AIMS: Immigrants are at increased risk of dying from external causes, particularly suicide. This study presents mortality data from a complete follow-up of a cohort of immigrants from the Former Soviet Union to Germany. Number of residential changes after migration and time period between residential change and death are analysed as predictors for suicide and other causes of mortality. METHODS: A representative cohort of immigrants (n=34,393) was followed up until 31 December 2002. Residential changes were monitored through city registries. Standardized mortality ratios were calculated for all causes of death and external causes of death (suicides, accidents, other external causes) and deaths attributable to psychoactive substance use. Data on residential change were analysed using Poisson regression to examine differences in external-cause mortality among immigrants who changed residence after immigration. Mortality rates by time since changing residence were calculated, and linear regression analysis was performed to model the effect of cause of death on the time interval between residential change and death. RESULTS: Male immigrants had a significantly higher risk of dying from external causes and suicide than Germans, and this increases with frequency of residential changes. Suicide mortality was significantly higher shortly after residential change. Linear regression showed that time to death after residential change was 2.5 times shorter for suicide than for any other cause. CONCLUSIONS: High risk of death from external causes and from deaths attributable to substance abuse in immigrants suggests integration problems. Preventive efforts at targeted integration programmes for immigrants, in particular shortly after residential change, are recommended. SN - 1403-4948 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18635733/Effects_of_residential_changes_and_time_patterns_on_external_cause_mortality_in_migrants:_results_of_a_German_cohort_study_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1403494807087293?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -