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Ferruginous conditions dominated later neoproterozoic deep-water chemistry.
Science. 2008 Aug 15; 321(5891):949-52.Sci

Abstract

Earth's surface chemical environment has evolved from an early anoxic condition to the oxic state we have today. Transitional between an earlier Proterozoic world with widespread deep-water anoxia and a Phanerozoic world with large oxygen-utilizing animals, the Neoproterozoic Era [1000 to 542 million years ago (Ma)] plays a key role in this history. The details of Neoproterozoic Earth surface oxygenation, however, remain unclear. We report that through much of the later Neoproterozoic (<742 +/- 6 Ma), anoxia remained widespread beneath the mixed layer of the oceans; deeper water masses were sometimes sulfidic but were mainly Fe2+-enriched. These ferruginous conditions marked a return to ocean chemistry not seen for more than one billion years of Earth history.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nordic Center for Earth Evolution and Institute of Biology, Campusvej 55, University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense, Denmark. dec@biology.sdu.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18635761

Citation

Canfield, Donald E., et al. "Ferruginous Conditions Dominated Later Neoproterozoic Deep-water Chemistry." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 321, no. 5891, 2008, pp. 949-52.
Canfield DE, Poulton SW, Knoll AH, et al. Ferruginous conditions dominated later neoproterozoic deep-water chemistry. Science. 2008;321(5891):949-52.
Canfield, D. E., Poulton, S. W., Knoll, A. H., Narbonne, G. M., Ross, G., Goldberg, T., & Strauss, H. (2008). Ferruginous conditions dominated later neoproterozoic deep-water chemistry. Science (New York, N.Y.), 321(5891), 949-52. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1154499
Canfield DE, et al. Ferruginous Conditions Dominated Later Neoproterozoic Deep-water Chemistry. Science. 2008 Aug 15;321(5891):949-52. PubMed PMID: 18635761.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ferruginous conditions dominated later neoproterozoic deep-water chemistry. AU - Canfield,Donald E, AU - Poulton,Simon W, AU - Knoll,Andrew H, AU - Narbonne,Guy M, AU - Ross,Gerry, AU - Goldberg,Tatiana, AU - Strauss,Harald, Y1 - 2008/07/17/ PY - 2008/7/19/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/7/19/entrez SP - 949 EP - 52 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 321 IS - 5891 N2 - Earth's surface chemical environment has evolved from an early anoxic condition to the oxic state we have today. Transitional between an earlier Proterozoic world with widespread deep-water anoxia and a Phanerozoic world with large oxygen-utilizing animals, the Neoproterozoic Era [1000 to 542 million years ago (Ma)] plays a key role in this history. The details of Neoproterozoic Earth surface oxygenation, however, remain unclear. We report that through much of the later Neoproterozoic (<742 +/- 6 Ma), anoxia remained widespread beneath the mixed layer of the oceans; deeper water masses were sometimes sulfidic but were mainly Fe2+-enriched. These ferruginous conditions marked a return to ocean chemistry not seen for more than one billion years of Earth history. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18635761/Ferruginous_conditions_dominated_later_neoproterozoic_deep_water_chemistry_ L2 - https://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18635761 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -