Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Is larval (maggot) debridement effective for removal of necrotic tissue from chronic wounds?
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2008 Jul-Aug; 35(4):378-84.JW

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Debridement is considered an essential component of wound bed preparation. Multiple techniques for removing necrotic tissue from wounds have been identified, but evidence concerning the efficacy and indications for each technique varies.

OBJECTIVES

We sought to identify evidence related to the efficacy of maggot (larval) debridement for the removal of necrotic tissue and its impact on wound healing.

SEARCH STRATEGY

A systematic review of electronic databases was undertaken using the following key words: (1) debridement, (2) maggot therapy, and (3) larval therapy. All prospective and retrospective studies published between January 1960 and February 2008 that compared maggot (larval) debridement therapy for pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, or burn wounds to autolytic debridement or other debridement techniques were included in the review.

RESULTS

The evidence base for the efficacy of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in the management of necrotic wounds is sparse. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that MDT is as effective as or more effective than other debridement methods, or that MDT promotes wound healing.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Even though clinical evidence supporting the use of MDT for debridement of wounds is lacking, clinical experience strongly suggests that this technique is an effective and safe method of debridement for selected patients. Expert clinicians with extensive experience using this technique usually advocate MDT as a last resort treatment when conservative means for wound bed preparation prove unsuccessful or when surgery is not feasible owing to comorbid conditions or other considerations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22908, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18635985

Citation

Gray, Mikel. "Is Larval (maggot) Debridement Effective for Removal of Necrotic Tissue From Chronic Wounds?" Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing : Official Publication of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society, vol. 35, no. 4, 2008, pp. 378-84.
Gray M. Is larval (maggot) debridement effective for removal of necrotic tissue from chronic wounds? J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2008;35(4):378-84.
Gray, M. (2008). Is larval (maggot) debridement effective for removal of necrotic tissue from chronic wounds? Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing : Official Publication of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society, 35(4), 378-84. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.WON.0000326655.50316.0e
Gray M. Is Larval (maggot) Debridement Effective for Removal of Necrotic Tissue From Chronic Wounds. J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2008 Jul-Aug;35(4):378-84. PubMed PMID: 18635985.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is larval (maggot) debridement effective for removal of necrotic tissue from chronic wounds? A1 - Gray,Mikel, PY - 2008/7/19/pubmed PY - 2008/11/19/medline PY - 2008/7/19/entrez SP - 378 EP - 84 JF - Journal of wound, ostomy, and continence nursing : official publication of The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society JO - J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Debridement is considered an essential component of wound bed preparation. Multiple techniques for removing necrotic tissue from wounds have been identified, but evidence concerning the efficacy and indications for each technique varies. OBJECTIVES: We sought to identify evidence related to the efficacy of maggot (larval) debridement for the removal of necrotic tissue and its impact on wound healing. SEARCH STRATEGY: A systematic review of electronic databases was undertaken using the following key words: (1) debridement, (2) maggot therapy, and (3) larval therapy. All prospective and retrospective studies published between January 1960 and February 2008 that compared maggot (larval) debridement therapy for pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, or burn wounds to autolytic debridement or other debridement techniques were included in the review. RESULTS: The evidence base for the efficacy of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in the management of necrotic wounds is sparse. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that MDT is as effective as or more effective than other debridement methods, or that MDT promotes wound healing. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Even though clinical evidence supporting the use of MDT for debridement of wounds is lacking, clinical experience strongly suggests that this technique is an effective and safe method of debridement for selected patients. Expert clinicians with extensive experience using this technique usually advocate MDT as a last resort treatment when conservative means for wound bed preparation prove unsuccessful or when surgery is not feasible owing to comorbid conditions or other considerations. SN - 1528-3976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18635985/Is_larval__maggot__debridement_effective_for_removal_of_necrotic_tissue_from_chronic_wounds L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.WON.0000326655.50316.0e DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -