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Diagnosis of acute hepatitis C virus infection and estimated incidence in low- and high-risk English populations.
J Viral Hepat 2008; 15(12):871-7JV

Abstract

The diagnosis of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is not straightforward; few people exhibit clinical symptoms and genome/antigen detection techniques do not indicate when infection had occurred. Here, a strategy to detect HCV RNA in the absence of antibody ('window-period') for diagnosis of acute infection is assessed. The sentinel surveillance of hepatitis testing study was used to retrospectively identify anti-HCV negative samples from high-risk individuals (2002-2003), for testing singly for HCV RNA. Additional samples were identified prospectively (2005) and tested in pools for HCV RNA. Positive samples were genotyped. Incidence and costs of adopting the pooling strategy were estimated. In the retrospective study, 8/390 (2.1%) samples were confirmed HCV RNA positive, anti-HCV negative. Prospectively, 3237 samples were tested in 325 pools. Five positive pools identified four confirmed HCV RNA positive patients (one false positive). Estimated incidence was 12.9 per 100 person-years in injecting drug users (IDUs) (retrospective study) and 3.7 per 100 person-years among drug/alcohol services and prison attendees (prospective study). Estimated costs were pound 850 per positive sample, in areas of higher risk. The yield from a window-period strategy depends upon the population tested. Pooled HCV RNA testing of anti-HCV negative samples from the current IDUs is realistic and relatively inexpensive to identify recently infected individuals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Immunisation, Health Protection Agency, Centre for Infections, London, UK. lisa.brant@hpa.org.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18637073

Citation

Brant, L J., et al. "Diagnosis of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Estimated Incidence in Low- and High-risk English Populations." Journal of Viral Hepatitis, vol. 15, no. 12, 2008, pp. 871-7.
Brant LJ, Ramsay ME, Balogun MA, et al. Diagnosis of acute hepatitis C virus infection and estimated incidence in low- and high-risk English populations. J Viral Hepat. 2008;15(12):871-7.
Brant, L. J., Ramsay, M. E., Balogun, M. A., Boxall, E., Hale, A., Hurrelle, M., ... Irving, W. L. (2008). Diagnosis of acute hepatitis C virus infection and estimated incidence in low- and high-risk English populations. Journal of Viral Hepatitis, 15(12), pp. 871-7. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2893.2008.01009.x.
Brant LJ, et al. Diagnosis of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Estimated Incidence in Low- and High-risk English Populations. J Viral Hepat. 2008;15(12):871-7. PubMed PMID: 18637073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diagnosis of acute hepatitis C virus infection and estimated incidence in low- and high-risk English populations. AU - Brant,L J, AU - Ramsay,M E, AU - Balogun,M A, AU - Boxall,E, AU - Hale,A, AU - Hurrelle,M, AU - Kaluba,L, AU - Klapper,P, AU - Lewis,D, AU - Patel,B C, AU - Parry,J, AU - Irving,W L, Y1 - 2008/07/10/ PY - 2008/7/19/entrez PY - 2008/7/19/pubmed PY - 2009/1/16/medline SP - 871 EP - 7 JF - Journal of viral hepatitis JO - J. Viral Hepat. VL - 15 IS - 12 N2 - The diagnosis of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is not straightforward; few people exhibit clinical symptoms and genome/antigen detection techniques do not indicate when infection had occurred. Here, a strategy to detect HCV RNA in the absence of antibody ('window-period') for diagnosis of acute infection is assessed. The sentinel surveillance of hepatitis testing study was used to retrospectively identify anti-HCV negative samples from high-risk individuals (2002-2003), for testing singly for HCV RNA. Additional samples were identified prospectively (2005) and tested in pools for HCV RNA. Positive samples were genotyped. Incidence and costs of adopting the pooling strategy were estimated. In the retrospective study, 8/390 (2.1%) samples were confirmed HCV RNA positive, anti-HCV negative. Prospectively, 3237 samples were tested in 325 pools. Five positive pools identified four confirmed HCV RNA positive patients (one false positive). Estimated incidence was 12.9 per 100 person-years in injecting drug users (IDUs) (retrospective study) and 3.7 per 100 person-years among drug/alcohol services and prison attendees (prospective study). Estimated costs were pound 850 per positive sample, in areas of higher risk. The yield from a window-period strategy depends upon the population tested. Pooled HCV RNA testing of anti-HCV negative samples from the current IDUs is realistic and relatively inexpensive to identify recently infected individuals. SN - 1365-2893 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18637073/Diagnosis_of_acute_hepatitis_C_virus_infection_and_estimated_incidence_in_low__and_high_risk_English_populations_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2893.2008.01009.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -