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Bioavailability of polyphenon E flavan-3-ols in humans with an ileostomy.
J Nutr. 2008 Aug; 138(8):1535S-1542S.JN

Abstract

To investigate the degree of absorption of flavan-3-ols in the small intestine, human subjects with an ileostomy ingested 200 mg of Polyphenon E, a green tea extract, after which ileal fluid and urine, collected over a 24-h period, were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array and mass spectrometric detection. The data obtained indicated that although approximately 40% of flavan-3-ol intake is recovered in ileal fluid, substantial quantities are absorbed in the small intestine. Moreover, 14 urinary metabolites, comprising sulfates, glucuronide, and methylated derivatives, were identified and quantified. All were metabolites of (epi)catechin or (epi)gallocatechin, representing 47 +/- 2% and 26 +/- 9%, respectively, of the ingested parent compound. These high recoveries indicate that these flavan-3-ols absorbed in the small intestine are much more bioavailable than most dietary flavonoids. No 3-O-galloylated flavan-3-ols or their metabolites were detected in urine. The absence of urinary flavan-3-ol metabolites after ingestion of 200 mg of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate indicates that there is no removal of the 3-O-galloyl group in vivo, and hence, this does not account for the high urinary recovery of (epi)gallocatechin metabolites after ingestion of Polyphenon E. Increasing the intake of Polyphenon E, by feeding doses of 200, 500, and 1500 mg, led to increased urinary excretion of (epi)catechin metabolites but not metabolites of (epi)gallocatechin. Coingestion of 200 mg of Polyphenon E with bread, cheese, or glucose did not significantly modify the absorption, metabolism, and excretion of flavan-3-ols. It does not necessarily follow, however, that the same would occur when flavan-3-ols are ingested with more complex food matrices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Plant Products and Human Nutrition Group, Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18641203

Citation

Auger, Cyril, et al. "Bioavailability of Polyphenon E Flavan-3-ols in Humans With an Ileostomy." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 138, no. 8, 2008, 1535S-1542S.
Auger C, Mullen W, Hara Y, et al. Bioavailability of polyphenon E flavan-3-ols in humans with an ileostomy. J Nutr. 2008;138(8):1535S-1542S.
Auger, C., Mullen, W., Hara, Y., & Crozier, A. (2008). Bioavailability of polyphenon E flavan-3-ols in humans with an ileostomy. The Journal of Nutrition, 138(8), 1535S-1542S.
Auger C, et al. Bioavailability of Polyphenon E Flavan-3-ols in Humans With an Ileostomy. J Nutr. 2008;138(8):1535S-1542S. PubMed PMID: 18641203.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bioavailability of polyphenon E flavan-3-ols in humans with an ileostomy. AU - Auger,Cyril, AU - Mullen,William, AU - Hara,Yukihiko, AU - Crozier,Alan, PY - 2008/7/22/pubmed PY - 2008/9/3/medline PY - 2008/7/22/entrez SP - 1535S EP - 1542S JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 138 IS - 8 N2 - To investigate the degree of absorption of flavan-3-ols in the small intestine, human subjects with an ileostomy ingested 200 mg of Polyphenon E, a green tea extract, after which ileal fluid and urine, collected over a 24-h period, were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array and mass spectrometric detection. The data obtained indicated that although approximately 40% of flavan-3-ol intake is recovered in ileal fluid, substantial quantities are absorbed in the small intestine. Moreover, 14 urinary metabolites, comprising sulfates, glucuronide, and methylated derivatives, were identified and quantified. All were metabolites of (epi)catechin or (epi)gallocatechin, representing 47 +/- 2% and 26 +/- 9%, respectively, of the ingested parent compound. These high recoveries indicate that these flavan-3-ols absorbed in the small intestine are much more bioavailable than most dietary flavonoids. No 3-O-galloylated flavan-3-ols or their metabolites were detected in urine. The absence of urinary flavan-3-ol metabolites after ingestion of 200 mg of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate indicates that there is no removal of the 3-O-galloyl group in vivo, and hence, this does not account for the high urinary recovery of (epi)gallocatechin metabolites after ingestion of Polyphenon E. Increasing the intake of Polyphenon E, by feeding doses of 200, 500, and 1500 mg, led to increased urinary excretion of (epi)catechin metabolites but not metabolites of (epi)gallocatechin. Coingestion of 200 mg of Polyphenon E with bread, cheese, or glucose did not significantly modify the absorption, metabolism, and excretion of flavan-3-ols. It does not necessarily follow, however, that the same would occur when flavan-3-ols are ingested with more complex food matrices. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18641203/Bioavailability_of_polyphenon_E_flavan_3_ols_in_humans_with_an_ileostomy_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/138.8.1535S DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -